Do I have to take propecia for life after a hair transplant?

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  • Delphi
    Senior Member
    • Mar 2009
    • 546

    Do I have to take propecia for life after a hair transplant?

    I have a question for the doctors on this site or another expert. Assuming that I am a good candidate for hair transplant surgery, and everything goes well, would I have to continue taking Propecia for the rest of my life to maintain my transplanted hair?
  • Plum
    Member
    • Jan 2009
    • 57

    #2
    While I am not a doctor, or a so-called "expert", I can tell you that the good news is that the transplanted hair will remain even without the use of Propecia. HOWEVER, one must consider the reason male hair transplant patients are typically encouraged to use Propecia: To slow down or halt the further progression of balding. In other words, your transplanted hair will not depend on Propecia, but much of your other hair may (if you are someone who propecia works for of course).

    You'll notice that hair is always transplanted from the back of the scalp. This is not by chance that the surgery is done this way. It is this hair that is resistant to male pattern balding. When this hair is transplanted, it maintains that resistance to miniaturizing and falling out, even when transplanted to areas that have thinning or balding.

    I hope this makes sense!

    Comment

    • gillenator
      Senior Member
      • Dec 2008
      • 1417

      #3
      Originally posted by Plum
      While I am not a doctor, or a so-called "expert", I can tell you that the good news is that the transplanted hair will remain even without the use of Propecia. HOWEVER, one must consider the reason male hair transplant patients are typically encouraged to use Propecia: To slow down or halt the further progression of balding. In other words, your transplanted hair will not depend on Propecia, but much of your other hair may (if you are someone who propecia works for of course).

      You'll notice that hair is always transplanted from the back of the scalp. This is not by chance that the surgery is done this way. It is this hair that is resistant to male pattern balding. When this hair is transplanted, it maintains that resistance to miniaturizing and falling out, even when transplanted to areas that have thinning or balding.

      I hope this makes sense!
      Good explanation Plum!
      "Gillenator"
      Independent Patient Advocate
      more.hair@verizon.net

      NOTE: I am not a physician and not employed by any doctor/clinic. My opinions are not medical advice nor are they the opinions of the following endorsing physicians: Dr. Bob True & Dr. Bob Dorin

      Comment

      • gillenator
        Senior Member
        • Dec 2008
        • 1417

        #4
        Anyone formally diagnosed with MPB will continue with the progression for a lifetime. And the reason for this is because MPB is in fact a genetically related type of hairloss. In other words, as long as we live, we carry the genes, and henceforth the lifetime progression. The medical term for this disease is androgenetic alopecia.

        The more exisitng native hair we have left, the more we have to save from further loss and the more critical finasteride (Propecia) becomes in our medicinal regimen.

        The donor hair in the back of the skull (occipital area) that Plum referred to is in fact terminal hair, meaning DHT resistant, no matter where it is re-situated in the scalp. Sometimes doctors have intentionally or unintentionally taken donor "outside of the safe zone". We think it's terminal hair because it was taken from the back of the head. It's not a perfect science. But IMHO, all HT docotrs should be making their best responsible effort to at least check the occipital zone for any signs of miniturization. In other words, each patient's "safe zone" needs to be identified "before" the strip is excised or in the case of FUE, before any extractions are made.

        Try posing that question in your consultation and watch your doctor fall out of his chair!

        Bottom line, you don't need Propecia for the transplanted hair, just the weak native hair that is subject to DHT and subsequent future loss.
        "Gillenator"
        Independent Patient Advocate
        more.hair@verizon.net

        NOTE: I am not a physician and not employed by any doctor/clinic. My opinions are not medical advice nor are they the opinions of the following endorsing physicians: Dr. Bob True & Dr. Bob Dorin

        Comment

        • Delphi
          Senior Member
          • Mar 2009
          • 546

          #5
          I apologize for not thanking you all for answering my question sooner, I was out of town on vacation and did not check in. Thanks you for your responses and I will take this information under advisement. I always assumed that once you had a hair transplant then you would be all set. Iím wrong about that obviously and your answers make perfect sense.

          Thanks again!

          Comment

          • Plum
            Member
            • Jan 2009
            • 57

            #6
            Not to worry. Glad we could help.

            Comment

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