So CAL DR ADVICE

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  • jackedup
    Junior Member
    • Apr 2010
    • 6

    So CAL DR ADVICE

    I am going to have a hair transplant in June of this year in Southern California. I am very lucky to have been taking propecia since I was 18. So, I only have thinning/recession in the front around the hairline. I am currently taking AVODART, Rogaine, and Propecia. I have visited several doctors. Some of them have recomended as few as 800-900 grafts. Others have recomended as many as 1200. Having done my own research it seems silly to have the surgery for anything less than 1200 grafts. Thoughts?

    Finally, my hair isn't bad enough to risk having anything less than a near perfect frontal hairline as a result of the procedure. I am currently considering Dr. Melvin Mayer and Dr. Craig Ziering. Opinions on these doctors? Ziering wants 9000 and Mayer wants 5000. I am more concerned about having a great result than the cost but paying nearly double has me concerned. Thoughts? Opinions? Ideas? If you were in my situation which doctor would you choose? Do you think that I should consult with another surgeon in Southern California?
  • CIT_Girl
    Senior Member
    • Mar 2010
    • 302

    #2
    I'm not familiar with either of those doctors so I'm afraid I can't give you an opinion. It's generally recommended on this forum that you try and find an IAHRS-recommended surgery. This endorsement is generally a good indicator that the surgeon is highly qualified and performs top-quality transplants. Have you consulted with any of the IAHRS doctors in California? nhttp://www.iahrs.org/searchresults.asp?sID=%B2%9A

    It's definitely a good idea NOT to base your decision on the price but I can understand your hesitancy in going with one that is almost twice as much- particularly if you cannot see a discernible difference in their work. Did they both recommend the same number of grafts, just at different prices per graft? Are you going with a strip or a FUE procedure?

    Comment

    • hindsight2020
      Member
      • May 2010
      • 52

      #3
      Just curious, how old are you?

      I had a HT when I was 24, and continued to bald. I am now at a crossroads and either have to get more and more HT's done to continue to just have moderately thin hair, or shave it off to reveal scars.

      If your young, I would really really suggest not doing it.

      Comment

      • TeeJay73
        Senior Member
        • Oct 2008
        • 238

        #4
        I like HindSight2020's suggestion. If you are young, it is awesome that you're taking medication to prevent any further hair loss. [By the way, why take both Avodart and Propecia?] Now if you are too young (in my opinion, less than 30 years old is too young for an HT), then consider NOT having an HT done, and simply continuing with your medication until later years in life, when you will have a better sense of how you have stabilized, if at all. I too had a surgery to early in life (I was 27 when I had my 1st HT), and really, what I needed to do, was continue with medication and wait until my 30s or later for surgery. As Spencer says, "surgery will always be there". There's no need to rush into it, especially when you may be young.

        If you are in your 30s or older, or simply dead-set on having surgery despite your age, then an awesome surgeon in Southern California is Doctor Paul McAndrews (he is a member of the IAHRS). I had surgery with him in Feb of 2008, a total of 1600 grafts. I was ECSTATIC with the results, and I would recommend him even to closest family members. However, do realize he may be as expensive, or slightly higher, than your current $9000 estimate. But in my opinion, when going for an HT, one should not let cost be the deciding factor, especially for something they'll live with forever.

        Good luck!

        TeeJay

        Comment

        • hindsight2020
          Member
          • May 2010
          • 52

          #5
          Originally posted by TeeJay73
          I like HindSight2020's suggestion. If you are young, it is awesome that you're taking medication to prevent any further hair loss. [By the way, why take both Avodart and Propecia?] Now if you are too young (in my opinion, less than 30 years old is too young for an HT), then consider NOT having an HT done, and simply continuing with your medication until later years in life, when you will have a better sense of how you have stabilized, if at all. I too had a surgery to early in life (I was 27 when I had my 1st HT), and really, what I needed to do, was continue with medication and wait until my 30s or later for surgery. As Spencer says, "surgery will always be there". There's no need to rush into it, especially when you may be young.

          If you are in your 30s or older, or simply dead-set on having surgery despite your age, then an awesome surgeon in Southern California is Doctor Paul McAndrews (he is a member of the IAHRS). I had surgery with him in Feb of 2008, a total of 1600 grafts. I was ECSTATIC with the results, and I would recommend him even to closest family members. However, do realize he may be as expensive, or slightly higher, than your current $9000 estimate. But in my opinion, when going for an HT, one should not let cost be the deciding factor, especially for something they'll live with forever.

          Good luck!

          TeeJay
          Great advice. One thing I think a lot of people forget to mention, and has happened to me is... You become more comfortable with be bald/balding as your peers start to. If your like me and started in your very early 20's, it was a rough thing to swallow. But as you get older, you understand its just natural, and you just got there a bit early.

          If you ever get to that point AFTER having a HT, you have a whole new set of issues to deal with, and they are NOT natural, but the outcome of poor decisions you made when you were panicing about being the first of your friends to go bald.

          Comment

          • Dr. Glenn Charles
            IAHRS Recommended Hair Transplant Surgeon
            • Nov 2008
            • 2423

            #6
            I know Dr Kenneth Siporin and Dr. Paul MnAndrews both do very high quality work. I am friends with both of them and they are very personable and take a lot of pride in each hair restoration procedure.
            Dr. Glenn Charles
            Member, International Alliance of Hair Restoration Surgeons
            View my IAHRS Profile

            Comment

            • Winston
              Moderator
              • Mar 2009
              • 943

              #7
              It good that you found this forum and that youíre taking the time to do your research. TeeJay73 has given some very sound advice and Spencer Kobren does say that surgery will always be there so donít make any hasty decisions. I would not stray from the IAHRS when considering a hair transplant surgeon so you should not let location be your deciding factor.

              Comment

              • Locke
                Member
                • Apr 2010
                • 75

                #8
                Originally posted by TeeJay73
                Now if you are too young (in my opinion, less than 30 years old is too young for an HT), then consider NOT having an HT done, and simply continuing with your medication until later years in life, when you will have a better sense of how you have stabilized, if at all. I too had a surgery to early in life (I was 27 when I had my 1st HT), and really, what I needed to do, was continue with medication and wait until my 30s or later for surgery. As Spencer says, "surgery will always be there". There's no need to rush into it, especially when you may be young.

                TeeJay
                I don't understand this point of view though. If I want to get a hair transplant, ideally I'd want to get it young so I look my age and I can actually enjoy my youth instead of worrying about baldness.

                The only reason that is legitimate for not having a HT at a young age is not being able to stabilize one's hairloss and not knowing how much donor hair to use.

                Comment

                • hindsight2020
                  Member
                  • May 2010
                  • 52

                  #9
                  Originally posted by Locke
                  I don't understand this point of view though. If I want to get a hair transplant, ideally I'd want to get it young so I look my age and I can actually enjoy my youth instead of worrying about baldness.

                  The only reason that is legitimate for not having a HT at a young age is not being able to stabilize one's hairloss and not knowing how much donor hair to use.
                  Yea... unfortunately when you get a HT at a young age you just create more problems for yourself later in life.

                  Yes, it will take care of your baldness to an extent, the problem is ... your not done balding, and no one can predict how and where you'll bald throughout your life. I am at a crossroads now... i see my hair really starting to thin again. I have 3 options, they way i see it.

                  1. Get additional transplants as I continue to thin/bald. More scars, More money .. for the possibility of more hair.

                  2. Do nothing. Let my hair thin out around my HT and be ok with the fact that I am walking around with an island of dollhair on my head.

                  3. Say f*ck it. I would rather go back to shaving my head (which I came to prefer vs having a HT). Scar reduction, laser hair removal... back to square one.

                  All that money, to end up how I would've looked anyways, but at least I get to keep my scars!!!

                  Comment

                  • level
                    Member
                    • Apr 2010
                    • 99

                    #10
                    Hindsight-I'm familiar with your story and I know you preach against HT (which I agree with) but because of the pluggy look you have, I would recommend you look into another HT, with a reputable doc, in order to cover the area. your recommendations are good for the younger guys who haven't had any work done, but in your case, you had crappy work that needs to be covered up. I know you feel you're past it and i know you're ready to move forward with life, but hair is obviously an issue that has concerned you throughout your life. Good luck with whichever route you take and thanks for sharing your story with us.

                    Like many guys, I was about to blindly get an HT without doing the proper research. I'm glad I found this forum and I'm glad guys like you are willing to share their stories-it really helps give some guidance to the younger crowd.

                    Comment

                    • level
                      Member
                      • Apr 2010
                      • 99

                      #11
                      Man, take a look at this guy:

                      I thought this might help one or two people riding on the rollercoaster of highs and lows.. since their/your recent HT.. I know what it was like waiting for something to happen post op and wanted to give some words of encouragement.. even though I've had 3 HT's.. (2 world class HT's by Dr Feller). I think its still


                      truly incredible! He has a similar story to yours. I'm not trying to sway you, I just came across this and had to share.

                      Comment

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