Addressing root cause of male pattern baldness: a well known approach? - Page 9 - BaldTruthTalk.com
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  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2020 View Post
    the "absence of blood" that you call is ACTUALLY THE RESULT from the lack of ACTIVE(read: ANAGEN) follicles and not the other way around.

    ^ Do you acknowledge that or you'll ignore that fact again?
    With respect to the possibility that your right. It would then still be foolish to assume that with good blood flow the affects Of any possibls cause couldn't be avoided. Maybe you need to stop thinking about what's happening to balding heads and consider the aspects of the people not loseing their hair. Loose thick skin. At the very least you would have to consider its alternative being neither are proven one way or other in fact despite your one person arm study you have no proof. Even the arm is a stretch the Point is you picked a side before facts are present that makes you closed minded....no insult intended. All the studies I have shown suggest you to atleast entertain the idea people thought the world was flat.

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2020 View Post
    not that I approve your theory, but Japanese men consume lots of soy and they don't get any "estrogen symptoms".... this doesn't make any sense.

    Wasn't there a study on rats and soy isoflavones and hair growth? The results were good. What happened there?
    Of course, i was also on finasteride. But the only time i got side effects was after i started drinking 8 oz of soymilk per day for ten days. The eleventh i had a typical estrogen crash, stopped soymilk and everything returned to normality. Not implying anything and all studies say it's relatively safe, but i'm not touching soy again anytime soon. Perhaps your body has to get used to it.

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2020 View Post
    the "absence of blood" that you call is ACTUALLY THE RESULT from the lack of ACTIVE(read: ANAGEN) follicles and not the other way around.

    ^ Do you acknowledge that or you'll ignore that fact again?
    The pressure of blood as well as the ability for it to flow freely is determined by three things…simply put. The pressure exerted by the pump (heart), the relaxing and contracting of the artery walls, and the transport of blood through capillaries via muscle contraction. These three things when met in harmony…genetically…..allow some people not to go bald. So then rather then assuming the absence of “good” blood flow can not cause balding you can then reverse this thought and see it as “good” blood flow allows people not to go bald. Furthermore, taking away a “run off line” or hair root would not take away free flow and should show no such blood flow reduction. It would be absurd to think if you had a piping system running through the city and removed one house or even thousands the rest would experience reduction in water pressure. If anything the resulting pressure if all constants remain the same would increase flow. If then this true then you have no reasonable explanation for why balding men only in the areas balding have a reduction of blood flow in the capillary system simply because some small release points (hair roots) are no longer in need of blood. Keep in mind the measure of blood flow do not involve one hair root but rather the overall flow of blood to a generalized area measured by the force of blood through the capillaries not the hair shafts. Tight muscles in the face and back of the head pull down upon the scalp and apply pressure on these capillaries much like stepping on a hose and trying to water a garden. Thin skin would be more susceptible as it does not apply added cushion to this pressure, stress could induce tight neck muscles pulling on all the muscles of the head, frowning too often or staring at the sunlight could contribute by squinting and pulling down on the frontal muscles. Hardening of arteries due to western diet would further add to the problem. It would be then safe to assume 85 percent of people balding in various ways are doing this by many aspects some from different causes and the very few that are not losing their hair are in a group not experiencing these situations…..make sense?

  4. #84
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    bump!

    we really need to find something that binds to DHT or "neutralizes" DHT in some other way rather than just by blocking its conversion from T...

  5. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2020 View Post
    bump!

    we really need to find something that binds to DHT or "neutralizes" DHT in some other way rather than just by blocking its conversion from T...
    That's a pretty tall order, since DHT and testosterone have the same receptor site. It's debatable whether you can healthfully go without DHT. You just can't healthfully go without test. You're one of the more knowledgeable posters, so I'm sure I'm not telling you anything you don't know, but the similar affinity for receptors of DHT and test makes it hard to directly target one without targeting the other.

    Unless there is something I don't know about them.

  6. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davey Jones View Post
    That's a pretty tall order, since DHT and testosterone have the same receptor site. It's debatable whether you can healthfully go without DHT. You just can't healthfully go without test. You're one of the more knowledgeable posters, so I'm sure I'm not telling you anything you don't know, but the similar affinity for receptors of DHT and test makes it hard to directly target one without targeting the other.

    Unless there is something I don't know about them.
    huh? T has nothing to do with miniaturization. People with 5AR deficiency don't go bald despite high levels of T

  7. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2020 View Post
    huh? T has nothing to do with miniaturization. People with 5AR deficiency don't go bald despite high levels of T
    DHT does have a much higher affinity for the androgen receptor, maybe that has something to do with it. Or it could be that subtle differences in DHT has something to do with the cascade involving prostaglandins. I'm not sure. But it stands that DHT and testosterone bind to the same receptor site because they have a similar reactivity. I would assume that anything that affects DHT directly would affect testosterone, though possibly to a lesser degree.

  8. #88
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    right, so is there any product that emulates equol or SHBG? We don't need it to be very effective. 30% would probably halt MPB for life for most people

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    Nice, 2020, you actually contribute to the topic of this thread!
    Check this: http://phys.org/news113902673.html

    The title is self explanatory. High carb diet > fatty liver > low SHBG (among other things) > high DHT.

    By the way, I am currently trying a diet-only approach, before attempting supplementation with preg/thyroid hormones. 6 more weeks on a ketogenic diet should give me back a semblance of leptin sensitivity, opening the way for an increase of resting metabolic rate. Albeit i fear i will have to give it a push with supplementation all the same.

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aston View Post
    Nice, 2020, you actually contribute to the topic of this thread!
    Check this: http://phys.org/news113902673.html

    The title is self explanatory. High carb diet > fatty liver > low SHBG (among other things) > high DHT.

    By the way, I am currently trying a diet-only approach, before attempting supplementation with preg/thyroid hormones. 6 more weeks on a ketogenic diet should give me back a semblance of leptin sensitivity, opening the way for an increase of resting metabolic rate. Albeit i fear i will have to give it a push with supplementation all the same.
    I have low SHBG and low DHT. How does that factor into all of this? You can see my results here http://www.baldtruthtalk.com/showthread.php?t=8794

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