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  1. #1
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    Question FUE or FUT ?

    I am so confused by the different hair transplant procedures. Which is the better solution that will deliver a more natural looking result?

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    Hey M Law, I am not a doctor by any stretch of the imagination, but I have had the FUT method with Doctor McAndrews. I believe naturalness is driven by the fact that the hairs are transplanted in their naturally occxuring groupings (called follicular units), and not by the method type (FUT or FUE). I believe the key difference between FUT and FUE is the scarring that results from the procedure. FUT leaves a thin linear scar which is covered by even a short haircut. FUE leaves less of a scar as I understand it. Definitely talk to a doctor about any other differences.

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    Thanks TeeJay for your reply. I suppose my next question is if the the FUT would deliver more density. I don't shave my head anyways, So I'm not really that concerned with a small visible scar. I care more about having more density on my hairline.

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    Hey M Law,

    I don't believe the FUT method (otherwise known as the "strip" method) has any significance as it relates to density, but, again, I'm not a doctor. The FUT and FUE methods simply refer to how the grafts are harvested from your donor region (back of your head).

    With FUT, an entire strip of tissue is removed from the back of your scalp, which contains hundreds or thousands of follicular hair units. Your scalp is closed shut and sutured. This is what produces a thin linear scar. Then the doctor and his/her staff dissect the excised strip of tissue into individual follicular units, and transplant them one-by-one into tiny incisions into the area of your scalp to be transplanted.

    With FUE, inidividual follicular units are extracted from your donor region, and transplanted into the tiny incisions in your scalp. I believe this is why there is substantially less (or even zero) scarring with FUE. The follicular units are just pulled out of the back of your head and relocated.

    I'm not sure of all the pros and cons of either method, but I don't believe either has a profound affect on your density outcome. Density is related to how many grafts you pack into a given area, and this is irrespective of the type of hair transplant surgery performed (FUT or FUE). I'm not sure if there is a difference in yield between either method (i.e., how any grafts survive the transplant and grow in their new area), but, if there is, then this may affect your density outcome.

    Just stick with the IAHRS doctors and your hair transplant will look like a million bucks (but won't cost that much!). I had an original hair transplant with a big name clinic, and it was not good. When I found the IAHRS, my path of bad luck turned around.

    Hope this helps -- TeeJay
    Last edited by TeeJay73; 10-30-2008 at 09:35 PM.

  5. #5
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    Smile FUT vs FUE

    Quote Originally Posted by M Law View Post
    I am so confused by the different hair transplant procedures. Which is the better solution that will deliver a more natural looking result?
    My opinion:

    1. Want to keep your hair a little bit longer and get bang for your buck: FUT or STRIP.

    2. Want to keep you REAL hair short and have little or no scar. Cost more for less hair. : FUE.

    (small touch up work.....FUE)

  6. #6
    Senior Member Dr. Feller's Avatar
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    The difference between FUT and FUE are simple and obvious.
    FUT, for the most part, enjoys consistently high yields of over 90%.

    FUE, on the other hand, has wildly varying yields, sometimes as low as 50%.

    Why?

    Because FUE grafts are subjected to three detrimental forces that FUT grafts are not:
    1: Torsion- Twisting of the graft
    2: Traction- Pulling of the graft
    3: Compresion-Squeezing of the graft

    There are a few more minor detrimental forces associated with FUE, but those are the important ones.

    Now, that's not to say that FUE doesn't have it's place. It most certainly does:
    1. Patients who CAN'T have any more strip surgery due to prior procedures
    2. Patients who simply DON'T want strip surgery for whateve personal reason
    3. Patients who need a limited amount of grafts as in a "fill-in" procedure or a "touch-up" procedure.

    There have been some exceptionally impressive FUE results over the years. However, the number of these impressive results compared to the number of FUE procedures performed simply does NOT compare to strip surgery.

    My recommendation is that if you are going for more than say 1,200 graft, go for a strip surgery as it is still the best bang for the buck.

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    Question one more question

    Quote Originally Posted by TeeJay73 View Post
    Hey M Law,

    I don't believe the FUT method (otherwise known as the "strip" method) has any significance as it relates to density, but, again, I'm not a doctor. The FUT and FUE methods simply refer to how the grafts are harvested from your donor region (back of your head).

    With FUT, an entire strip of tissue is removed from the back of your scalp, which contains hundreds or thousands of follicular hair units. Your scalp is closed shut and sutured. This is what produces a thin linear scar. Then the doctor and his/her staff dissect the excised strip of tissue into individual follicular units, and transplant them one-by-one into tiny incisions into the area of your scalp to be transplanted.

    With FUE, inidividual follicular units are extracted from your donor region, and transplanted into the tiny incisions in your scalp. I believe this is why there is substantially less (or even zero) scarring with FUE. The follicular units are just pulled out of the back of your head and relocated.

    I'm not sure of all the pros and cons of either method, but I don't believe either has a profound affect on your density outcome. Density is related to how many grafts you pack into a given area, and this is irrespective of the type of hair transplant surgery performed (FUT or FUE). I'm not sure if there is a difference in yield between either method (i.e., how any grafts survive the transplant and grow in their new area), but, if there is, then this may affect your density outcome.

    Just stick with the IAHRS doctors and your hair transplant will look like a million bucks (but won't cost that much!). I had an original hair transplant with a big name clinic, and it was not good. When I found the IAHRS, my path of bad luck turned around.

    Hope this helps -- TeeJay
    Teejay - Thanks man for taking the time to share your thoughts on this.

    Quote Originally Posted by JustJoe View Post
    My opinion:

    1. Want to keep your hair a little bit longer and get bang for your buck: FUT or STRIP.

    2. Want to keep you REAL hair short and have little or no scar. Cost more for less hair. : FUE.

    (small touch up work.....FUE)
    Hey Joe - Thats 2 for FUT being more bang for the buck, I know Dr. Feller said the same thing. I am thinking that is a better route for me if I decide to go forward with it. Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Feller View Post
    Because FUE grafts are subjected to three detrimental forces that FUT grafts are not:
    1: Torsion- Twisting of the graft
    2: Traction- Pulling of the graft
    3: Compresion-Squeezing of the graft
    Hi Dr. Feller - Many thanks for replying to my question. That really helps to clear things up and makes sense. I am curious why torsion, traction, and compression can occur during FUE. Is this based on the skill of the surgeon or something that can just happen no matter how skilled he/she is?
    Last edited by M Law; 11-24-2008 at 12:25 AM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Dr. Feller's Avatar
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    Those three dertimental FUE forces are inherent to EVERY FUE procedure no matter who is performing it.

    The problem is that many FUE doctors, especially the "grandstanders" omit this information from their promotional materials. By the way, failure to disclose this information is considered medical malpractice in some states as such omission can be considered a failure to provide informed consent.

    In my clinic, I have minimized these detrimental forces through the use of custom made tools and protocols. All my tools have been disclosed publicly and have even been described in the leading textbook "Hair Transplantation" 4th edition.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Feller View Post
    Those three dertimental FUE forces are inherent to EVERY FUE procedure no matter who is performing it.

    The problem is that many FUE doctors, especially the "grandstanders" omit this information from their promotional materials. By the way, failure to disclose this information is considered medical malpractice in some states as such omission can be considered a failure to provide informed consent.

    In my clinic, I have minimized these detrimental forces through the use of custom made tools and protocols. All my tools have been disclosed publicly and have even been described in the leading textbook "Hair Transplantation" 4th edition.

    Yeah, Dr .Feller, you're pretty good at the dense packing FUE procedure, I'll give you that. You're outspoken too, I'll give you that. Your laser video was a little lame thou. LOL! Just kidding....kinda. I don't use a laser anymore, but I do think it has some merit. I would not tell anyone to go out any buy one, but there is something to the laser. I don't think it grows hair, but it does have some effect. I can't prove it, so I'll have to drop the topic.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Dr. Feller's Avatar
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    VIDEO: Short version
    http://www.fellermedicaldata.com/Video/laser2.wmv

    VIDEO: Long version
    http://www.fellermedicaldata.com/Video/laser1.wmv

    What makes the video "lame"? I am genuinely curious as to what you didn't agree with.

    As the video shows, laser light cannot pass to the follicle. It is an inarguable fact of physics, and one that the LLLT industry overlooked when hyping their products.

    That's why no industry representative nor LLLT doctor bothered to respond to the video or to the discussions that took place afterward. Doesn't that raise a very big red flag in your mind as a consumer?

    But hey, if Mr. Michaels, his crack laser staff, or any LLLT doctor wants to debate the merits of the video on Spencer's radio show, I'm up for it. Are they?
    Last edited by Dr. Feller; 11-25-2008 at 07:10 AM.

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