NEOSH101 - Where did it go? - BaldTruthTalk.com
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  1. #1
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    Default NEOSH101 - Where did it go?

    Have any of you that have been around for a while heard of a growth stimulant called NEOSH101 that was apparently superior to Rogaine so it has been claimed.

    The compound was originally named OSH101, and it was owned by OsteoScreen. Neosil acquired the patent later. It was then owned by a company named Peplin, and they did not its seems continue to work the potential product. As far as I can tell the patent is now owned by a Danish company called LEO Pharma. I am not sure if they are currently developing this patent for the market place.

    If you look at some older sites the testing was looking very positive it was being promoted as the topical replacement to Minoxidil and seemingly without sides.

    I wonder why such an potentially interesting product has not been brought to the market place. An argument is that no single company is prepared to make such in investment in just one product.

  2. #2
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    I think that Neosil had something really promising but then they went out of business. Then other companies buy the rights to their products but shelve them because it's not 'cost effective' for them to market or produce something like NEOS101 right now. Or they shelve the product for some other reason. What sucks is that if some one else wants to test the product or the ingredients that make the product grow hair, they can't because the company that shelved the product owns the patent to it. It really sucks that all of these pharmaceutical companies are more about making money than curing diseases. I think that what happened with RegeneRx is a similar story. They discovered that a chemical called TB4-7 grows hair and they were supposedly going to attempt to create a product based on this. Then this idea got shelved for some reason and has remained shelved for years and years. Then Adistem in Korea was attempting to create a product with TB4-7 to regrow hair, yet the product was only available for a few months and then it was discontinued. I'd bet it was because RegeneRx owned a patent for using TB4-7 to regrow hair and Adistem was afraid they'd sue them for copyright infringement. Unfortunately the pharmaceutical industry is more about making money than curing diseases.

  3. #3
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    It's just frustrating cus there are so many patents to treat hair loss yet nobody is doing a damn thing to test them on humans and bring them to the marketplace.

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    wow that drug name is a blast from the past. I remember that it had such potential but it ended up being purchased and then shelved. They are not even testing it at all.

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    I suspect that the big companies that sell hair loss products may have bought these formulas and taken this product off the shelves as it was a threat to the the billion dollar hair industry, they have much to loose if a product that restores hair loss and does not need frequent re-use existed. Just like the story of the electric car that was taken off the market during the 90's , as seen in the documentary "who killed the electric car?" a 2006 documentary that explores the creation, and discontinuation of the commercial electric car by oil&gaz billionaire companies.

    Could rogain and propecia the bald man's worst enemies???

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    Interesting claim, kiki40. Reminds me of the argument stating the industry stands to make more money in treatments rather than cures, and will suppress said solutions for the very purposes of profit.

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    I couldn't agree with you more, kiwi40. I think the history behind this drug was that it was a proteasome inhibitor originally developed by a company called Osteoscreen. Then the patent and technology was subsequently bought by a company called Neosil, which was then bought by a company called Peplin. Then I think Peplin sold the patent and technology to a company called Leo Pharmaceuticals which is based out of NJ. I've been doing tons of research on this and even called Leo Pharmaceuticals to inquire about this. The guy that I talked to was very nice and said that he didn't know the status of NEOS101, but said that he would look into it and call me back within a few days. This was about 3 months ago and I never got that return phone call.
    I totally agree about the claim that the pharmaceutical industry not wanting to cure a damn thing, but rather treat it so that they can make more money. Virtually every remedy out there is some type of pill or treatment that you need to keep on taking or the disease or ailment will come back if you discontinue usage. There is no money in the cure, but a continual treatment can make a pharmaceutical company millions, if not billions of dollars. There are so many hair loss remedies that are tested on mice countless times, proven to regrow hair on these mice, but never tested beyond mice. I've always questioned that. I mean, there are so many chemicals that could potentially cure our hair loss problems, but they are never tested beyond mice. I sure as hell know that makers of minoxidil and Merck (the company that makes Propecia) sure as hell don't want any other treatment that works better than theirs because then people would stop buying minoxidil and finasteride, and buy the superior treatment.
    One last disclaimer: the last time I brought this up, it seemed like some people on here didn't read a word I wrote and accused me of advocating testing hair regrowth chemicals on humans before mice, despite the fact that I never advocated that at all. Of course mice should be tested on first, no question about it. But so many times, after these chemicals are tested on mice countless times and no complications arise from these tests, then no company or individual bothers to look into developing clinical trials to see if these chemicals could work to cure human hair loss. That's what really pisses me off.
    I mean, I don't think that it's just some kind of coincidence that only 4 companies in the entire world are looking to cure hair loss, despite the fact that whoever cured it would make millions if not billions of dollars. That fact is very alarming to me and raises huge red flags about the medical and pharmaceutical industry.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by DepressedByHairLoss View Post
    I couldn't agree with you more, kiwi40. I think the history behind this drug was that it was a proteasome inhibitor originally developed by a company called Osteoscreen. Then the patent and technology was subsequently bought by a company called Neosil, which was then bought by a company called Peplin. Then I think Peplin sold the patent and technology to a company called Leo Pharmaceuticals which is based out of NJ. I've been doing tons of research on this and even called Leo Pharmaceuticals to inquire about this. The guy that I talked to was very nice and said that he didn't know the status of NEOS101, but said that he would look into it and call me back within a few days. This was about 3 months ago and I never got that return phone call.
    I totally agree about the claim that the pharmaceutical industry not wanting to cure a damn thing, but rather treat it so that they can make more money. Virtually every remedy out there is some type of pill or treatment that you need to keep on taking or the disease or ailment will come back if you discontinue usage. There is no money in the cure, but a continual treatment can make a pharmaceutical company millions, if not billions of dollars. There are so many hair loss remedies that are tested on mice countless times, proven to regrow hair on these mice, but never tested beyond mice. I've always questioned that. I mean, there are so many chemicals that could potentially cure our hair loss problems, but they are never tested beyond mice. I sure as hell know that makers of minoxidil and Merck (the company that makes Propecia) sure as hell don't want any other treatment that works better than theirs because then people would stop buying minoxidil and finasteride, and buy the superior treatment.
    One last disclaimer: the last time I brought this up, it seemed like some people on here didn't read a word I wrote and accused me of advocating testing hair regrowth chemicals on humans before mice, despite the fact that I never advocated that at all. Of course mice should be tested on first, no question about it. But so many times, after these chemicals are tested on mice countless times and no complications arise from these tests, then no company or individual bothers to look into developing clinical trials to see if these chemicals could work to cure human hair loss. That's what really pisses me off.
    I mean, I don't think that it's just some kind of coincidence that only 4 companies in the entire world are looking to cure hair loss, despite the fact that whoever cured it would make millions if not billions of dollars. That fact is very alarming to me and raises huge red flags about the medical and pharmaceutical industry.
    Things are changing bro, i.e. Histogen won a patent battle just recently.

    I think as new ideas come about that work around the existing patents we'll see more innovation. That seems to be happening now

  9. #9
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    I know this is an ole thread but i was looking into what happened to neosils hair growth peptide and it bought me to here and hairloss talk i remember that there was much talk on this back in 2004 and there was a guy im not sure what hairloss site it was that said he regrew his hair in quick time and you had to use it topically for say a two weeks or a month then rest using for 14 days and restart.
    Then he said he thinks he got a bad batch of the peptide and it did not do nothing i think he tried another batch again i also nearly bought some from a company called Labe and it was called psi and would be sent out in frozen package as i think it degenerates quickly if it gets warm perhaps thats why it got dropped but i think its due to money again.

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