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  1. #11
    Senior Member pkipling's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rizaan View Post
    pkipling, what made you a good HT canndidate? You say finesteride doesn't 'work' for you, and if you have ALA, won't you lose the rest of your hair gradually?
    Great question Rizaan. A lot of different factors go into being a good candidate for a HT and unfortunately, it's not as easy as some people seem to think it is. Here are some of the things you need to take into consideration when looking into whether or not a hair transplant is right for you:

    1) Genetics/Projected hair loss: How predisposed are you to losing your hair, and to what extent? How prominent is it in your family? One thing that is helpful is that surgeons can check the miniaturization levels of your hair and get a tentative "roadmap" of sorts to project where you may be heading with your hair loss. This will help determine how conservative or aggressive the surgeon can be with your hairline/overall placement, or if it's even a good idea to do at all.

    2) Age: How young were you when you first started losing your hair? How fast is it advancing? As a general rule, a person who starts losing their hair at 20 needs to be a lot more cautious than someone who starts losing their hair at 40, for example.

    3) Donor Supply/Hair Type: How thick is your hair and do you have enough density to be able to get the coverage you need? How is your hair type? Is it fine or coarse? Is is straight, wavy, or curly? These all factored in to how big of a challenge your procedure will be, and something you need to take into account when choosing a surgeon.

    4) Finances: Hair transplants are expensive! Not only that, but most people won't need just one hair transplant. They'll most likely need a second one and often a third or a fourth. Is this something you're financially ready for? Not only that, but is this something you want to spend the rest of your life tackling? It's not only a financial commitment, but a time commitment as well. It's often something you'll have to deal with for the rest of your life. And if you do need multiple hair transplants, do you have enough donor hair to make this work? If not, are you willing to try beard hair/body hair? Do you even have beard and body hair to use? It's also very important to note that while there are "cheap/affordable" options out there, you don't want to bargain shop for a hair transplant. Yes, there are fantastic doctors oversees that are more affordable than those in the US, UK, and Canada - but in general, you don't want to make a decision based solely on price.

    5) Expectations: This is key to having a positive experience. The fact of the matter is, Hair Transplants aren't a magical cure. No matter how good a surgeon is, there are limits to what we can achieve. It's called science. Not everyone will be able to achieve a Brad Pitt hairline/density, and to pretend otherwise is dishonest and cruel. If one can't properly manage their expectations and accept the reality of their own circumstances, then you shouldn't move forward with a HT. You'll only end up more distressed and miserable in the long run.

    6) Response/Willingness re: medication: Being willing to take Propecia is big factor, and a decision each man needs to make for himself. If you have very severe hair loss and aren't willing to take Propecia, then you may need to be more conservative with your approach to a HT than someone who will take the drug. Also, see how you respond to it. Do you have side effects? Is it something you want to take for the rest of your life? These are things to think about.

    7) Risks: Like it or not, every single medical procedure on this planet comes with risks. Results are not guaranteed. Yes, you can greatly increase your odds of a positive outcome by doing solid research and choosing a surgeon with a proven, consistent track record. But even the best surgeons in the world have less than stellar cases. This isn't just with hair transplants, but any medical procedure you have done ever. To think otherwise is naive. Is this something you feel comfortable with?

    So as you can see, this isn't an easy, black and white issue. Pursuing a hair transplant should be taken very seriously and given lots of consideration. And what the original poster was pointing out is that for many men, a very reasonable/logical conclusion for them is that they're happier not going through all of this. For me, based on my genetics, family history, age, donor supply, etc., I felt like I was a good candidate and decided to go through with it. Were/are there risks involved? Absolutely. But I went for it, and I'm glad I did. Am I out of the woods? Not by a long shot. I'm in this for the long haul, as is anyone else that goes down this road and you need to make sure you're okay with that.

    As for what Jean Luc is saying, "Without hair, you are inevitably a lesser human," and whatnot? Maybe it's because I'm a little older and have been through some shit in my life, but that's such BS. I guess what this ultimately comes down to is different philosophy on life. If someone subscribes to that mentality, then by all means, suffer and feel insignificant and worthless until you get the hair that you want. Personally, I don't think that's healthy. And frankly? Sometimes it's NOT POSSIBLE. Yes, getting a successful HT can do wonders for your confidence. But it's not necessary. And frankly? Sometimes it's just NOT POSSIBLE. I know plenty of highly successful bald men who are funny and charming and popular and happy with beautiful wives and lives that most men would be jealous of. That's a fact. Not a myth.

    Rizaan, I hope all of this makes sense and gives you a clearer picture. I don't know your situation or circumstances, but I do know that whatever they are, being happy is a choice we can all make right this second.... Wishing you nothing but the best no matter what part of the journey you're on.
    __________________
    I am a patient advocate for Dr. Parsa Mohebi in Los Angeles, CA. My views/opinions are my own and don't necessarily reflect the opinions of Dr. Mohebi and his staff.

  2. #12
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    Thank you for the long reply, pkipling.
    I started losing hair at 18 and am almost 21 now; diffuse thinner + MPB. I just recently started taking topical finesteride.
    I know what you're saying is true, but me being young, my mind just cannot get over the insecurity of losing hair no matter what advice you give me. It would have been different if this happened in my late 30s or 40s but I was one of the unlucky few to start suffering at such a young age.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by pkipling View Post
    Great question Rizaan. A lot of different factors go into being a good candidate for a HT and unfortunately, it's not as easy as some people seem to think it is. Here are some of the things you need to take into consideration when looking into whether or not a hair transplant is right for you:

    1) Genetics/Projected hair loss: How predisposed are you to losing your hair, and to what extent? How prominent is it in your family? One thing that is helpful is that surgeons can check the miniaturization levels of your hair and get a tentative "roadmap" of sorts to project where you may be heading with your hair loss. This will help determine how conservative or aggressive the surgeon can be with your hairline/overall placement, or if it's even a good idea to do at all.

    2) Age: How young were you when you first started losing your hair? How fast is it advancing? As a general rule, a person who starts losing their hair at 20 needs to be a lot more cautious than someone who starts losing their hair at 40, for example.

    3) Donor Supply/Hair Type: How thick is your hair and do you have enough density to be able to get the coverage you need? How is your hair type? Is it fine or coarse? Is is straight, wavy, or curly? These all factored in to how big of a challenge your procedure will be, and something you need to take into account when choosing a surgeon.

    4) Finances: Hair transplants are expensive! Not only that, but most people won't need just one hair transplant. They'll most likely need a second one and often a third or a fourth. Is this something you're financially ready for? Not only that, but is this something you want to spend the rest of your life tackling? It's not only a financial commitment, but a time commitment as well. It's often something you'll have to deal with for the rest of your life. And if you do need multiple hair transplants, do you have enough donor hair to make this work? If not, are you willing to try beard hair/body hair? Do you even have beard and body hair to use? It's also very important to note that while there are "cheap/affordable" options out there, you don't want to bargain shop for a hair transplant. Yes, there are fantastic doctors oversees that are more affordable than those in the US, UK, and Canada - but in general, you don't want to make a decision based solely on price.

    5) Expectations: This is key to having a positive experience. The fact of the matter is, Hair Transplants aren't a magical cure. No matter how good a surgeon is, there are limits to what we can achieve. It's called science. Not everyone will be able to achieve a Brad Pitt hairline/density, and to pretend otherwise is dishonest and cruel. If one can't properly manage their expectations and accept the reality of their own circumstances, then you shouldn't move forward with a HT. You'll only end up more distressed and miserable in the long run.

    6) Response/Willingness re: medication: Being willing to take Propecia is big factor, and a decision each man needs to make for himself. If you have very severe hair loss and aren't willing to take Propecia, then you may need to be more conservative with your approach to a HT than someone who will take the drug. Also, see how you respond to it. Do you have side effects? Is it something you want to take for the rest of your life? These are things to think about.

    7) Risks: Like it or not, every single medical procedure on this planet comes with risks. Results are not guaranteed. Yes, you can greatly increase your odds of a positive outcome by doing solid research and choosing a surgeon with a proven, consistent track record. But even the best surgeons in the world have less than stellar cases. This isn't just with hair transplants, but any medical procedure you have done ever. To think otherwise is naive. Is this something you feel comfortable with?

    So as you can see, this isn't an easy, black and white issue. Pursuing a hair transplant should be taken very seriously and given lots of consideration. And what the original poster was pointing out is that for many men, a very reasonable/logical conclusion for them is that they're happier not going through all of this. For me, based on my genetics, family history, age, donor supply, etc., I felt like I was a good candidate and decided to go through with it. Were/are there risks involved? Absolutely. But I went for it, and I'm glad I did. Am I out of the woods? Not by a long shot. I'm in this for the long haul, as is anyone else that goes down this road and you need to make sure you're okay with that.

    As for what Jean Luc is saying, "Without hair, you are inevitably a lesser human," and whatnot? Maybe it's because I'm a little older and have been through some shit in my life, but that's such BS. I guess what this ultimately comes down to is different philosophy on life. If someone subscribes to that mentality, then by all means, suffer and feel insignificant and worthless until you get the hair that you want. Personally, I don't think that's healthy. And frankly? Sometimes it's NOT POSSIBLE. Yes, getting a successful HT can do wonders for your confidence. But it's not necessary. And frankly? Sometimes it's just NOT POSSIBLE. I know plenty of highly successful bald men who are funny and charming and popular and happy with beautiful wives and lives that most men would be jealous of. That's a fact. Not a myth.

    Rizaan, I hope all of this makes sense and gives you a clearer picture. I don't know your situation or circumstances, but I do know that whatever they are, being happy is a choice we can all make right this second.... Wishing you nothing but the best no matter what part of the journey you're on.
    __________________
    I am a patient advocate for Dr. Parsa Mohebi in Los Angeles, CA. My views/opinions are my own and don't necessarily reflect the opinions of Dr. Mohebi and his staff.
    I'm not saying that one can't have a fulfilling and successful life while bald, I'm saying that you will simply have a life that is lesser than your potential. You make a transplant sound more complex than it actually is, probably because you're fine yourself and would rather be above others and allow other men to suffer.

    I do agree with the majority of what you said about expectations, meds and risks however.

    "being happy is a choice we can all make right this second..."

    And no, being happy is not a choice. What a stupid and ignorant thing to say. Not everyone has a beautiful hair transplant like yourself, although if they need it they should get one. If you were so happy before your transplant (and you weren't even that bald anyway) then why did you get one? You got one because life is shitter as a bald man.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by pkipling View Post
    Dude. Thank you for this. Even though I was fortunate enough to be a good candidate for a hair transplant, I do know that everything you're saying is true. So many of our struggles and shortcomings in life can be transformed and reimagined into something not so crippling if we just have the right attitude and perspective - both things that we have complete control over.

    Thank you for your words and your wisdom. I really hope many of the young hair loss sufferers who think their lives are over see this and gain a new perspective. There is always another way to live if we only choose to be open to its possibility.

    __________________
    I am a patient advocate for Dr. Parsa Mohebi in Los Angeles, CA. My views/opinions are my own and don't necessarily reflect the opinions of Dr. Mohebi and his staff.
    You're welcome, and thank you for taking the time to validate my views. Best of luck to you.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeanlucBergman View Post
    Such a disgusting post. Do you have pictures, or are you just another liar wanting more people to stay bald? The women interested in bald guys are ugly, have bad jobs or are just plain stupid. You've accepted mediocrity, that is all your post is about. You probably think Harry Potter is the pinnacle of western culture, I doubt for one second you'd have a decent job or the ability to have a legitimately intellectual conversation.

    Your "fun" with 3/10s is mediocrity. What you did was settle for second best. There's nothing inspiring about what you said, you've just accepted a shitty life.
    Hi Jean. I'll answer a few of your questions. I assure you I am not lying about anything I've posted. I have no reason to. I also have no reason to wish anyone stay bald to make me feel better about myself. In fact, I, like you, would prefer hair like everyone else on this forum. If a safe cure came out tomorrow, I'd be one of the first in line.

    I'm not sure why you've attacked me, or my wife, or for that matter, the love interests of anyone else on this forum. She is not ugly or stupid, and she does in fact have a good paying job at a company she has been with for close to twenty years. And, she is beautiful, inside and out. I haven't accepted mediocrity - I was just lucky enough to find my life partner at a young age.

    Also, I've never read any of the Harry Potter books.

    On settling for a shitty life - I think that's a matter of perspective. Your idea of an ideal life, and my idea of an ideal life are completely different, and that's perfectly fine, and in fact obvious considering our age differences and today's culture. I'm not here to judge you or your goals and aspirations. I hope you achieve them and find happiness. Everyone deserves to be happy. Do whatever it takes. But at the least,intellectually, you should be able to recognize that not everyone wants or needs the same things in life as you to be happy.

    Quote Originally Posted by JeanlucBergman View Post
    ...of this RIDICULOUS post without any photos basically telling people to accept a genetic defect. That isn't helping people to become a stronger person, it's telling them to accept their present state of failure, mediocrity and genetic inferiority.
    Again, if you take a look back at what I wrote, I wasn't telling anyone to accept baldness. I was telling them to do what makes them happy, and that there are different ways to stay positive should you choose to accept that treatment options are not the route you want to take. Hair transplants are a priority for you, and I totally get it. Your young and single with disposable income. But for others who do not have the financial means, especially those who put the needs of their families before themselves, it's not an option. Also, alot of people don't respond well to chemical treatments, so that may not be an option either.

    Finally, based on the clear prejudice you have against men who have accepted their genetic fate, it wouldn't matter what picture I post - you would not approve.

    Best of luck.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by pkipling View Post
    Great question Rizaan. A lot of different factors go into being a good candidate for a HT and unfortunately, it's not as easy as some people seem to think it is. Here are some of the things you need to take into consideration when looking into whether or not a hair transplant is right for you:

    1) Genetics/Projected hair loss: How predisposed are you to losing your hair, and to what extent? How prominent is it in your family? One thing that is helpful is that surgeons can check the miniaturization levels of your hair and get a tentative "roadmap" of sorts to project where you may be heading with your hair loss. This will help determine how conservative or aggressive the surgeon can be with your hairline/overall placement, or if it's even a good idea to do at all.

    2) Age: How young were you when you first started losing your hair? How fast is it advancing? As a general rule, a person who starts losing their hair at 20 needs to be a lot more cautious than someone who starts losing their hair at 40, for example.

    3) Donor Supply/Hair Type: How thick is your hair and do you have enough density to be able to get the coverage you need? How is your hair type? Is it fine or coarse? Is is straight, wavy, or curly? These all factored in to how big of a challenge your procedure will be, and something you need to take into account when choosing a surgeon.

    4) Finances: Hair transplants are expensive! Not only that, but most people won't need just one hair transplant. They'll most likely need a second one and often a third or a fourth. Is this something you're financially ready for? Not only that, but is this something you want to spend the rest of your life tackling? It's not only a financial commitment, but a time commitment as well. It's often something you'll have to deal with for the rest of your life. And if you do need multiple hair transplants, do you have enough donor hair to make this work? If not, are you willing to try beard hair/body hair? Do you even have beard and body hair to use? It's also very important to note that while there are "cheap/affordable" options out there, you don't want to bargain shop for a hair transplant. Yes, there are fantastic doctors oversees that are more affordable than those in the US, UK, and Canada - but in general, you don't want to make a decision based solely on price.

    5) Expectations: This is key to having a positive experience. The fact of the matter is, Hair Transplants aren't a magical cure. No matter how good a surgeon is, there are limits to what we can achieve. It's called science. Not everyone will be able to achieve a Brad Pitt hairline/density, and to pretend otherwise is dishonest and cruel. If one can't properly manage their expectations and accept the reality of their own circumstances, then you shouldn't move forward with a HT. You'll only end up more distressed and miserable in the long run.

    6) Response/Willingness re: medication: Being willing to take Propecia is big factor, and a decision each man needs to make for himself. If you have very severe hair loss and aren't willing to take Propecia, then you may need to be more conservative with your approach to a HT than someone who will take the drug. Also, see how you respond to it. Do you have side effects? Is it something you want to take for the rest of your life? These are things to think about.

    7) Risks: Like it or not, every single medical procedure on this planet comes with risks. Results are not guaranteed. Yes, you can greatly increase your odds of a positive outcome by doing solid research and choosing a surgeon with a proven, consistent track record. But even the best surgeons in the world have less than stellar cases. This isn't just with hair transplants, but any medical procedure you have done ever. To think otherwise is naive. Is this something you feel comfortable with?

    So as you can see, this isn't an easy, black and white issue. Pursuing a hair transplant should be taken very seriously and given lots of consideration. And what the original poster was pointing out is that for many men, a very reasonable/logical conclusion for them is that they're happier not going through all of this. For me, based on my genetics, family history, age, donor supply, etc., I felt like I was a good candidate and decided to go through with it. Were/are there risks involved? Absolutely. But I went for it, and I'm glad I did. Am I out of the woods? Not by a long shot. I'm in this for the long haul, as is anyone else that goes down this road and you need to make sure you're okay with that.

    As for what Jean Luc is saying, "Without hair, you are inevitably a lesser human," and whatnot? Maybe it's because I'm a little older and have been through some shit in my life, but that's such BS. I guess what this ultimately comes down to is different philosophy on life. If someone subscribes to that mentality, then by all means, suffer and feel insignificant and worthless until you get the hair that you want. Personally, I don't think that's healthy. And frankly? Sometimes it's NOT POSSIBLE. Yes, getting a successful HT can do wonders for your confidence. But it's not necessary. And frankly? Sometimes it's just NOT POSSIBLE. I know plenty of highly successful bald men who are funny and charming and popular and happy with beautiful wives and lives that most men would be jealous of. That's a fact. Not a myth.

    Rizaan, I hope all of this makes sense and gives you a clearer picture. I don't know your situation or circumstances, but I do know that whatever they are, being happy is a choice we can all make right this second.... Wishing you nothing but the best no matter what part of the journey you're on.
    __________________
    I am a patient advocate for Dr. Parsa Mohebi in Los Angeles, CA. My views/opinions are my own and don't necessarily reflect the opinions of Dr. Mohebi and his staff.


    So let's say you are in your 20's and your hit by hairloss. And throughout your 20s you see your peers getting all the action from the ladies and basically living the life you want. Then what are your options? Try and make the best of it or don't ultimately everyone comes to terms with the reality of their situation sooner or later!

    But the point of THIS WEBSITE here...is to offer transparent, honest information first and foremost. This man here is offering his subjective experience which will be UNIQUE and DIFFERENT from everybody else.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by blahblah View Post
    But the point of THIS WEBSITE here...is to offer transparent, honest information first and foremost. This man here is offering his subjective experience which will be UNIQUE and DIFFERENT from everybody else.
    Exactly. No two people are alike and no two experiences are alike. You will always find examples of bald successful men and successful men with hair (however it is you define success). There is absolutely nothing wrong with accepting male pattern baldness, and there is nothing wrong with not accepting it and doing something about it, and there is nothing wrong with accepting it and waiting to do something about it if the right solution for you becomes available. Whichever approach you take, don't stop making the most of your life...that would be the real tragedy, not hair loss.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by spitfire View Post
    Yep. In my forties. I don't think it sucks being older. I have a pretty good life because of my experiences. I'm in better shape than I've ever been. I will say, I'm motivated to stay in shape, partly to help me feel better about myself. I can't control my baldness, but there are other things I can control, and that keeps me motivated. Taking care of your teeth, staying clean from drugs and alcohol, taking care of your body and mind. All that helps believes it or not. also, my head is not bad. No bumps or moles/birthmarks. No scars either. Actually looking forward to greying. Hoping it makes me look more distinguished.
    You're in your forties and your hair isn't gray?

    That is interesting. Either you have a stress free life, or good genes. My hair started turning
    gray in my thirties.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by spitfire View Post
    Hi Jean. I'll answer a few of your questions. I assure you I am not lying about anything I've posted. I have no reason to. I also have no reason to wish anyone stay bald to make me feel better about myself. In fact, I, like you, would prefer hair like everyone else on this forum. If a safe cure came out tomorrow, I'd be one of the first in line.

    I'm not sure why you've attacked me, or my wife, or for that matter, the love interests of anyone else on this forum. She is not ugly or stupid, and she does in fact have a good paying job at a company she has been with for close to twenty years. And, she is beautiful, inside and out. I haven't accepted mediocrity - I was just lucky enough to find my life partner at a young age.

    Also, I've never read any of the Harry Potter books.

    On settling for a shitty life - I think that's a matter of perspective. Your idea of an ideal life, and my idea of an ideal life are completely different, and that's perfectly fine, and in fact obvious considering our age differences and today's culture. I'm not here to judge you or your goals and aspirations. I hope you achieve them and find happiness. Everyone deserves to be happy. Do whatever it takes. But at the least,intellectually, you should be able to recognize that not everyone wants or needs the same things in life as you to be happy.



    Again, if you take a look back at what I wrote, I wasn't telling anyone to accept baldness. I was telling them to do what makes them happy, and that there are different ways to stay positive should you choose to accept that treatment options are not the route you want to take. Hair transplants are a priority for you, and I totally get it. Your young and single with disposable income. But for others who do not have the financial means, especially those who put the needs of their families before themselves, it's not an option. Also, alot of people don't respond well to chemical treatments, so that may not be an option either.

    Finally, based on the clear prejudice you have against men who have accepted their genetic fate, it wouldn't matter what picture I post - you would not approve.

    Best of luck.
    Thank you for your understanding. I just think that for the majority of people that bald in their late teens and early twenties, life doesn't turn out that way, and they ultimately regret not getting transplants sooner. For every success story, there are another two failures where people are genuinely unhappy for decades of their life because of this issue, all because they heard too much noise about the risks of propecia and hair transplants. In reality they've cut 20 of the best years of their life off because idiots on forums told them they could be happy as bald people. I think if you're unhappy with your baldness and it's becoming an issue you worry about on a daily basis, you should do something about it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blahblah View Post
    So let's say you are in your 20's and your hit by hairloss. And throughout your 20s you see your peers getting all the action from the ladies and basically living the life you want. Then what are your options? Try and make the best of it or don't ultimately everyone comes to terms with the reality of their situation sooner or later!

    But the point of THIS WEBSITE here...is to offer transparent, honest information first and foremost. This man here is offering his subjective experience which will be UNIQUE and DIFFERENT from everybody else.
    If you have hairloss in your 20s, you should get a hair transplant as soon as you have the funding for one with a well regarded surgeon on the IAHRS list, preferably an FUT. You should also stop listening to the propecia horror stories and get on it ASAP.

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