How Do You Know If You Make A Good Candidate. - BaldTruthTalk.com
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  1. #1
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    Question How Do You Know If You Make A Good Candidate.

    How do you tell? Do you have to have certain type of hair or can any guy with genetic hair loss have one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jkel View Post
    How do you tell? Do you have to have certain type of hair or can any guy with genetic hair loss have one.
    Hey Jkel,

    This is just some of the criteria that an ethical hair transplant surgeon looks for when considering whether or not a prospective patient makes a good candidate for hair transplantation. Physicians also need to take into account the emotional state of the patient. Not everyone is equipped to deal with the cosmetic surgery process.

    These types of patients might qualify as good candidates for surgical intervention:


    1. Men who have been losing their hair due to typical male pattern baldness for more than five years or who have progressed to class 3 or above on the Norwood Scale.

    If you have diffuse unpatterned hair loss you are NOT a candidate for hair transplant surgery.


    2. Men who have realistic expectations and who understand that their hair loss might continue to progress after surgery, even if they are taking prescription medication to stop this progression. Additional procedures may be necessary to meet the patient's goals.

    3. Men who have been balding for many years, whose pattern has stabilized, and who are interested in adding some hair to provide a more youthful appearance.

    4. Men and women who have lost hair due to trauma or burns.

    5. Men and women who have lost hair due to other cosmetic procedures such as facelifts.

    Hair transplantation is not a one size fits all cosmetic procedure. If you are considering surgery, you'll need to be evaluated by a qualified hair transplant surgeon. Check out http://www.iahrs.org to find a qualified hair transplant surgeon in your area.

    Never jump into surgery! Take your time, ask plenty of questions, and know that there is no rush. Surgery will always be there.

    Hope this helps!
    Spencer Kobren
    Founder, American Hair Loss Association
    Host, The Bald Truth Radio Show

    I am not a physician. My opinions and knowledge concerning hair loss and its treatment are based on extensive research and reporting on the subject as a consumer advocate and hair loss educator. My views and comments on the subject should not be taken as medical advice. Always seek the advice of a medical professional when considering medical and surgical treatment.

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    Thanks Spencer!

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpencerKobren View Post
    Hey Jkel,


    If you have diffuse unpatterned hair loss you are NOT a candidate for hair transplant surgery.

    What exactly do you mean? What is diffuse patterned hair loss? My hair has been quite thin for few years. I have been using propecia for about 10 years and my hair has not gotten any thinner since I started using it. I am not obviously balding but I sure would like to have a little thicker hair. Would transplant be an option?

    I think propecia has stopped further hair loss but I really want thicker hair.

    So my question is if transplant is only for men who have lost a lot of hair?

  5. #5
    Administrator SpencerKobren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by typhoon View Post
    What exactly do you mean? What is diffuse patterned hair loss? My hair has been quite thin for few years. I have been using propecia for about 10 years and my hair has not gotten any thinner since I started using it. I am not obviously balding but I sure would like to have a little thicker hair. Would transplant be an option?

    I think propecia has stopped further hair loss but I really want thicker hair.

    So my question is if transplant is only for men who have lost a lot of hair?
    Hey Typhoon,

    There are two categories of diffuse hair loss; Diffuse Patterned Alopecia (DPA) and Diffuse Unpatterend Alopecia (DUPA). While many people who suffer with DPA can make good candidates for hair transplantation, people suffering with DUPA are never good candidates for surgical intervention, in my opinion.

    For example: Most women dealing with Androgenic Alopecia, common female pattern hair loss, suffer with DUPA (thinning that's occurs throughout the entire scalp).
    In simple terms a hair transplant is a surgical procedure that moves genetically stable hair (hair that is not genetically programmed to be lost due to genes and androgens) from the stable zone of the scalp to the balding or thinning areas of the scalp. The hair that is moved will generally grow for the rest of the patient's life. This is the basic theory of donor dominance in a nutshell.

    Since most female hair loss sufferers are dealing with DUPA (no stable donor area), women do not generally make great candidates for hair transplantation.

    There is a relatively small percentage of men who suffer with this type of Unpatterned Diffuse Alopecia, sometimes referred to as Female Pattern Hair Loss. These men make poor candidates for surgery for the same reason that most women should not have the procedure. If a DUPA patient undergoes a hair transplant procedure, there is a strong likelihood that the transplanted grafts will eventually miniaturize and be lost. Now the patient is left with a surgical scar that may become visible over time, coupled with the emotional challenges that many people are confronted with after having unsuccessful cosmetic surgery.

    DPA usually only effects the hairline and top of the scalp leaving a strong donor area to work with. Again since DPA patients can make good candidates for surgical intervention a proper diagnosis is crucial. Most true experts can differentiate between DUPA and DPA, however it can be more difficult in younger patients whose hair loss has not progressed to a significant point.

    During a hair transplant consult a physician should always check for hair miniaturization throughout the entire scalp to rule out DUPA before considering performing hair restoration surgery on any patient.

    I hope this helps!
    Spencer Kobren
    Founder, American Hair Loss Association
    Host, The Bald Truth Radio Show

    I am not a physician. My opinions and knowledge concerning hair loss and its treatment are based on extensive research and reporting on the subject as a consumer advocate and hair loss educator. My views and comments on the subject should not be taken as medical advice. Always seek the advice of a medical professional when considering medical and surgical treatment.

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    Hi Spencer. I am learning but still so much more to know. Should a doctor be able tell if you have miniaturization all over, just by looking with a magnifier? Or is a scalp biopsy neccasary? My derm wants to do a biopsy to see what or why . He thought I had chronic TE with contact dermitits. The contact dermitis has been ruled out. Dr. Redmond said the dermitis is caused from testosterone sensitivity and a testosterone blocker or birth control pills should be used. I am 60, so wonder also if menopause may be causing the sensitivty leading to the dermititis? I cannot find a good knowledgable doctor here who knows something. Most of the docs I have seen don't know their nose from their $%&^ as far as i'm concerned. I don't want to start a birth control pill that may increase my breast cancer chances . And by birth control, I assume that means the same as hormone replacement therapy? I also hate to start a testosterone blocker, which I assume he means spironolatone. In one of the post, Dr. Redmondwho responded to another person with dermitits, said,, spiro and T-Gel shampoo for 6 weeks should work. This is surprising that only 6 weeks are needed. This would be super great if so. Have you heard of this? I did ask you a question earlier, telling you I have a high dhea of 1200. Normal is about 375. So I'm way off the charts. I still have not heard from anyone regarding that. It seems there is nothing I can do to lower it. My level is high with no apparent reason. Had all the test to rule everything out. So I guess my hairloss which started with the dermitis is caused from testosterone sensitivity due to my high dhea? It looks like I'm doomed with a high dhea, and continued hair loss because of that, and I don't know which treatment I should do,.? birth control pills, hormone replacement therapy? Spiro?, Thanks for any help you may be able to offer. Kathy

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