Hair regrowth through wound healing process after ablative fractional laser treatment - BaldTruthTalk.com
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  1. #1
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    Default Hair regrowth through wound healing process after ablative fractional laser treatment

    Lasers Surg Med.

    2015 May 6


    Hair regrowth through wound healing process after ablative fractional laser treatment in a murine model.


    Abstract

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:
    Alopecia is one of the most common dermatological problems in the elderly; however, current therapies for it are limited by low efficacy and undesirable side effects. Although clinical reports on fractional laser treatment for various alopecia types are increasing, the exact mechanism remains to be clarified. The purposes of this study were to demonstrate the effect of ablative fractional laser treatment on hair follicle regrowth in vivo and investigate the molecular mechanism after laser treatment.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS:
    Ablative CO2 fractional laser was applied to the shaved dorsal skin of 7-week-old C57BL/6 mice whose hair was in the telogen stage. After 12 mice were treated at various energy (10-40 mJ/spot) and density (100-400 spots/cm2 ) settings to determine the proper dosage for maximal effect. Six mice were then treated at the decided dosage and skin specimens were sequentially obtained by excision biopsy from the dorsal aspect of each mouse. Tissue samples were used for the immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays to examine hair follicle status and their related molecules.

    RESULTS:
    The most effective dosage was the 10 mJ/spot and 300 spots/cm2 setting. The anagen conversion of hair was observed in the histopathological examination, while Wnt/β-catenin expression was associated with hair regrowth in the immunohistochemistry and molecular studies.

    CONCLUSIONS:
    Ablative fractional lasers appear to be effective for inducing hair regrowth via activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in vivo. Our findings indicate that fractional laser treatment can potentially be developed as new treatment options for stimulating hair regrowth.

    Lasers Surg. Med. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

    © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    KEYWORDS:
    alopecia; androgenic alopecia; fractional laser; hair follicle; hair loss; laser

  2. #2
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    Here is the other study I keep mentioning, also very very recent:


    Lasers Surg Med. 2015 Apr

    Enhancing hair follicle regeneration by nonablative fractional laser: Assessment of irradiation parameters and tissue response.

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:
    Identification of methods to enhance anagen entry can be helpful for alopecia. Recently, nonablative laser has been proposed as a potential treatment for alopecia. However, how the laser parameters affect stem cell activity, hair cycles and the associated side effects have not been well characterized. Here we examine the effects of irradiation parameters of 1,550-nm fractional laser on hair cycles.

    STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS:
    The dorsal skin of eight-week-old female C57BL/6 mice with hair follicles in synchronized telogen was shaved and irradiated with a 1,550-nm fractional erbium-glass laser (Fraxel RE:STORE (SR1500) Laser System, Solta Medical, U.S.A.) with varied beam energies (5-35?mJ) and beam densities (500-3500 microthermal zones/cm(2) ). The cutaneous changes were evaluated both grossly and histologically. Hair follicle stem cell activity was detected by BrdU incorporation and changes in gene expression were quantified by real-time PCR.

    RESULTS:
    Direct thermal injury to hair follicles could be observed early after irradiation, especially at higher beam energy. Anagen induction in the irradiated skin showed an all-or-non change. Anagen induction and ulcer formation were affected by the combination of beam energy and density. The lowest beam energy of 5?mJ failed to promote anagen entry at all beam densities tested. As beam energy increased from 10?mJ to 35?mJ, we found a decreasing trend of beam density that could induce anagen entry within 7-9 days with activation of hair follicle stem cells. Beam density above the pro-regeneration density could lead to ulcers and scarring followed by anagen entry in adjacent skin. Analysis of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-?, IL-1?, and IL-6, revealed that transient moderate inflammation was associated with anagen induction and intense prolonged inflammation preceded ulcer formation.

    CONCLUSION:
    To avoid side effects of hair follicle injury and scarring, appropriate combination of beam energy and density is required. Parameters outside the therapeutic window can result in either no anagen promotion or ulcer formation. Lasers Surg. Med. 47:331-341, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

    © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.






    I would assume it works similar to "the hair plucking study" that is also very very recent:

    http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~cmchuong/2015Hairpluck.pdf

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    So similar to what SM04554 is trying to accomplish but via lasers. I wonder if they could test this on humans relatively easily being we already use lasers on humans in other applications.

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    Quote Originally Posted by macbeth81 View Post
    So similar to what SM04554 is trying to accomplish but via lasers. I wonder if they could test this on humans relatively easily being we already use lasers on humans in other applications.
    I don't know about SMO4554 at all. This is similar to dermaroller wounding and plucking for sure... but maybe better.

    I'm not sure how hard/easy these trials would be. These are NOT AT ALL like laser helmets or laser combs.... this is a much much stronger laser... so... MAYBE comparable to laser hair removal (which is kinda-strong)

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    SM04554 is a Wnt/β-catenin activator. The May 6th article states they are activating using lasers.

    Regarding wounding, I wonder if the benoxaprofen patients regrew hair because of the photosensitivity side effect (severe sunburn). Same applies for the campfire man. Maybe it was the burn alone and not a combination of burn/drug. This article clearly demonstrates a goldilocks effect, so it is possible these individuals had just the right degree of injury.

    I am trying this wounding principle on my bald ankles using acid burn. Sounds like I have to find the breaking point were it scars then ease off to see if that works.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by macbeth81 View Post
    SM04554 is a Wnt/β-catenin activator. The May 6th article states they are activating using lasers.

    Regarding wounding, I wonder if the benoxaprofen patients regrew hair because of the photosensitivity side effect (severe sunburn). Same applies for the campfire man. Maybe it was the burn alone and not a combination of burn/drug. This article clearly demonstrates a goldilocks effect, so it is possible these individuals had just the right degree of injury.

    I am trying this wounding principle on my bald ankles using acid burn. Sounds like I have to find the breaking point were it scars then ease off to see if that works.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC3580982/

    Current Laser Resurfacing Technologies: A Review that Delves Beneath the Surface



    Abstract
    Numerous laser platforms exist that rejuvenate the skin by resurfacing its upper layers. In varying degrees, these lasers improve the appearance of lentigines and rhytides, eliminate photoaging, soften scarring due to acne and other causes, and treat dyspigmentation. Five major classes of dermatologic lasers are currently in common use: ablative and nonablative lasers in both fractionated and unfractionated forms as well as radiofrequency technologies. The gentler nonablative lasers allow for quicker healing, whereas harsher ablative lasers tend to be more effective.

    Fractionating either laser distributes the effect, increasing the number of treatments but minimizing downtime and complications. In this review article, the authors seek to inform surgeons about the current laser platforms available, clarify the differences between them, and thereby facilitate the identification of the most appropriate laser for their practice.

    Laser resurfacing technologies represent an exciting development in the cosmetic surgeon's repertoire to improve the tone, texture, and pigmentation of the skin. Although laser resurfacing is not a substitute for a facelift or blepharoplasty, the appropriate laser not only tightens the skin somewhat but also improves the appearance of lentigines, rhytides, skin texture, and a wide variety of scars.

    There are ablative and nonablative lasers as well as fractionated and nonfractionated lasers. Nonfractionated lasers act on the entire projected surface area of the treated skin, whereas fractionated lasers target an equally distributed portion of the projected area. An easy way to understand the difference is in looking at the pixels that compose a TV image. Nonfractionated devices treat every single pixel whereas fractionated devices treat only a percentage of the pixels in the treatment area.

    Ablative lasers vaporize tissue and therefore are more aggressive compared with the gentler nonablative lasers that leave the skin intact. Although ablative lasers result in far more down time and a more difficult recovery process, they remain the lasers that produce the most dramatic outcomes. For more severe facial wrinkles, dyspigmentation, and textural skin challenges, the ablative laser is often the treatment of choice.

    For patients seeking more moderate improvementówithout the possible side effects of ablative lasersónonablative lasers are often ideal. These lasers leave the epidermis intact while producing rejuvenating skin effects. Depending on the technology, nonablative laser treatments may minimize the appearances of finer wrinkles, ameliorate the texture and tone of the skin, and treat dyspigmentation. By comparison, the treatments are gentler and require little to no downtime, but produce a more moderate response.

    Ultimately, a patient's needs dictate the selection of the ideal laser. In this review, we seek to demystify the differences between the many available lasers and thereby facilitate the identification of the most appropriate laser for the patient.
    Laser skin resurfacing began with the application of the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser to facial rejuvenation, initiating a new era in the field of photorejuvenation. These first lasers allowed the physician more precision than was previously available with older dermabrasion and chemical peeling techniques. These first CO2 lasers operated using a continuous wave (CW). While providing skin enhancement, the rates of side effects were high, including undesirable scarring. To increase control of how much and what type of tissue would be removed, short-pulse CO2 lasers were developed. However, this technique was still ablative and retained a long 2-week recovery period.





    --------------


    1450-nm Diode Laser (Candela Smoothbeam)

    The 1450-nm diode laser is effective for the treatment of facial acne as well as for improving the appearance of scarring.24 The nonablative laser has been shown to dramatically and safely improve inflammatory facial acne by partially damaging sebaceous glands to reduce sebum secretions.25 The 1450-nm diode laser has demonstrated greater scar response after treatment than the nonablative 1320-nm Nd:YAG laser; this quality has been particularly helpful for patients with acne scarring.26 The laser is believed to achieve these results by targeting sebaceous glands in the upper dermis while sparing the epidermis, reducing downtime.27 The laser focuses on the water in the skin, which is likely why the upper dermis is heated and therapeutically damaged.28 Interestingly, the 1450-nm laser appears to induce a systemic effect on the skin, as treatment on only one side of the face in one 2011 study resolved acne lesions on both sides of the face.29 Unfortunately, in our experience, subsurfacing laser technology has had limited improvement of facial wrinkling. Downtime is minimal and is restricted to temporary erythema, edema, and hyperpigmentation after treatments.30 This laser achieves mild to moderate improvement of acne scarring in Asian patients without producing permanent pigmentary change even in darker skin types IV and V.31,32

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    this is without a doubt our only hope for something being available in the next 3-5 years..... just wanted to reiterate that


    It seems like a beam energy of 10 mj is the best (found in both the wounding studies)....

    my questions are:

    1. how did the two studies differ in lasers? One was ablative and one was non-ablative.... essentially one vaporizes your skin and the other just *****s it up without vaporizing it..... but what other differences existed?

    2. What other settings other than mj are we concerned with? One study refers to something call spot/cm2 and the other says mtz/cm2..... is that the same scale?

    3. If we know 10mj is the best setting..... and we figure out wtf the other settings are for mice.... then who/how can we translate those over to a GUESS at the human setting? I assume they must have done something similar when first testing other lasers on mice before moving to humans.....

    4. What is the best place to test this to: (a) avoid ambiguous results and (B) not have a terrible scar in an obvious place...... Ideally you would test the nape (if it were slightly thinning).... but thats not ideal for part (a)

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    Why does nobody comment on this? I find this very exciting because it works the same like Sm which is actually tested in a trial with only Norwoods higher than 4. This must have big potential and activating the Wnt patchway with the help of lasers instead a drug should have far less sides.

    I hope they will follow researching and start a trial soon.

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    Have to take the time to read the abstracts on this, it's something new at least.

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    This looks good, but it aims to activate the WNT pathway, same as SM04554, and SM is much closer than this.

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