Can you wear buzzed hair (particularly on top) with FUE if you continue to lose hair? - BaldTruthTalk.com
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  1. #1
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    Default Can you wear buzzed hair (particularly on top) with FUE if you continue to lose hair?

    I know that HT's are permanent. However, if I had a procedure to fill out the thinning across the top..could I buzz this down if my hair started to go south over time? I am looking at an HT from worst case scenario where I lose more hair. At 25 I would be overjoyed to be able to have my hair for another 10 years so that I can make up for lost time. If, after that, I can no longer style it..I want to know if the option of the buzzing the top completely (to zero) exists. Can leave the sides and back a little longer to cover donor marks.

    Background:
    25, Diffuse pattern thinner (thin all over the top), been on propecia almost 2 hairs, hair loss is stable - losing since 17. Considering an FUE procedure soon. Very noticeable loss but 2000-2500 grafts would make a significant difference because of the way I style my hair.

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    I'm going for a consultation with Dr Reddy in London next week. I intend to ask this, as well as look at similar patients photos/perhaps even actual clients to see for myself. I tan well and have fairly "olive" type skin which makes me think I could be okay. However, are "pot marks" still a concern with modern FUE procedures? In general, are there still "holes" or obvious contour dips where the implants are when shaven? If so, i'd be quite put off the whole procedure altogether

  3. #3
    Doctor Representative JoeTillman's Avatar
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    As an olive skinned individual you do not have olive tinted scars. They are white, so you may actually have MORE obvious donor scarring than someone with more fair skin. Also, transplanted hair is not always permanent so don't let anyone tell you otherwise. It is supposed to be but evidence is mounting that shows that even donor hair can be sensitive to DHT and this accounts for some of the cases where patients complain that their "hair transplants are falling out" after an initial period of healthy and normal growth. Assume nothing, question everything.

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    I'm more concerned about the transplanted scars than the donor scarring even though you're totally right. And yes, of course it makes sense that even as part of the aging process, donor hair would thin over time.

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    Doctor Representative JoeTillman's Avatar
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    Well, that is another issue altogether. You'll need to ask how the incisions are made and ask to see patients where you can look up close to see how the recipient zone looks. Even with longer hair, if you are able to inspect closely, you'll see scarring. Also, don't confuse hair loss with the aging process. They are not one and the same.

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    Yeah but that's the original issue of my thread.

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    Senior Member FlightTL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeTillman View Post
    As an olive skinned individual you do not have olive tinted scars. They are white, so you may actually have MORE obvious donor scarring than someone with more fair skin. Also, transplanted hair is not always permanent so don't let anyone tell you otherwise. It is supposed to be but evidence is mounting that shows that even donor hair can be sensitive to DHT and this accounts for some of the cases where patients complain that their "hair transplants are falling out" after an initial period of healthy and normal growth. Assume nothing, question everything.
    I love this cat Joe Tillman. He is so damn honest about hair transplants, it's refreshing.....

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    Senior Member gillenator's Avatar
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    22able,

    If you have been losing hair since age 17, then that's a goof indicator that you are headed for the most advanced class of hair loss such as Norwood class 7. If you have men on either side of your family history that are Norwood 7s, than that's a real possibility for you.

    The implication then is you undoubtedly will be chasing this progression of loss for a long time or until you run out of donor, and you will eventually if you are headed for advanced hair loss.

    Whether you choose FUE or FUHT, scarring will be an issue no matter the skill of the surgeon because of the multiple procedures needed along with the volume of extractions and also the volume of recipient incisions.

    If you choose to still move forward, then I highly recommend that you keep a very conservative level of density overall. The shorter length of hair style will allow for lower density levels however the scarring also becomes more visible. Not a good trade-off.

    So if you have Norwood 7 in your cards, think long and hard before ever getting started.

    This may very well be not what you want to hear yet over the years I have dialogued with many guys in a similar profile as yours and many wish they would have just buzzed their scalps and not got started with surgery.
    "Gillenator"
    Independent Patient Advocate
    more.hair@verizon.net

    NOTE: I am not a physician and not employed by any doctor/clinic. My opinions are not medical advice nor are they the opinions of the following endorsing physicians: Dr. James Harris, Dr. Bob True & Dr. Bob Dorin

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by gillenator View Post
    22able,

    If you have been losing hair since age 17, then that's a goof indicator that you are headed for the most advanced class of hair loss such as Norwood class 7. If you have men on either side of your family history that are Norwood 7s, than that's a real possibility for you.

    The implication then is you undoubtedly will be chasing this progression of loss for a long time or until you run out of donor, and you will eventually if you are headed for advanced hair loss.

    Whether you choose FUE or FUHT, scarring will be an issue no matter the skill of the surgeon because of the multiple procedures needed along with the volume of extractions and also the volume of recipient incisions.

    If you choose to still move forward, then I highly recommend that you keep a very conservative level of density overall. The shorter length of hair style will allow for lower density levels however the scarring also becomes more visible. Not a good trade-off.

    So if you have Norwood 7 in your cards, think long and hard before ever getting started.

    This may very well be not what you want to hear yet over the years I have dialogued with many guys in a similar profile as yours and many wish they would have just buzzed their scalps and not got started with surgery.
    Hi Gillenator,

    Thanks for your comments. My grandfather on my mothers side was a norwood 6 who started early in his youth, a little later than me. My dad is a norwood 6 and he didn't start until he was 40 then lost it in a diffuse fashion in about 9 years. So yes, most likely, this is where im heading. However, I am on finasteride and intend to use it indefinitely. While it may not be advised, i'm viewing the transplant as a "temporary" solution provided that the surgeon i'm consulting with can show me specific examples of his work that tailor my needs and goals for the future. Only under these circumstances, will I consider it. I have no issue shaving down to any level which still conceals the scarring when i'm in my mid 30's. But right now, i've lost my hair very gradually from 17 to 25 in a diffuse pattern and some of my friends still don't even notice i'm losing my hair. A single procedure around 2500+ grafts and continuation with the medication (potentially with dutasteride if i begin to lose ground quickly) should get me a run of at LEAST 5 years. By which point I will be closer to an age where losing hair will make me feel more comfortable. If I need to undergo a second transplant to maintain my hairline which I can then shave down, I will be happy to do so. I also think that a lot of men who get hair transplants are crap at styling their hair or don't do anything to it. I've used hair products for years and it's helped me hide my hair loss successfully, this is also another factor I am considering when undergoing transplant.

    Do not mistake, the point of this thread is that I am not fully sold on the idea of a transplant. However, the benefit/costs are what i'm trying to weigh up when I consider the skills that my surgeon can offer in allowing me to opt for a very short/shaved hair style in the future if I decide to not continually return for repeat procedures. The scarring/"pot mark" effects of transplanted hair are issues I have which will affect my decision to undergo a transplant.

    When it comes to hair transplants without medication to suppress further loss, I think anyone doing so is very foolish. I believe that 80% of those losing their hair from 17-45 will eventually go towards a norwood 6 inevitably. Age shouldn't be a factor in that males being transplanted on at 35 are more likely to head to norwood 6/7 without medication just as much as somebody losing their hair at 17. In this case, about 10% of men are probably realistic hair transplant candidates to maintain a decent full head of hair. If I can have hair to run me through the prime of my life up until about 35 and then buzz it once i'm settled with nothing visually noticeable (maintaining low density, short top cut and slightly longer sides to hide scarring) then that to me is a successful transplant given my expectations for the future. And that's conservatively ruling out further treatments or progression in the industry. I'd like to hear your thoughts given my personal outlook and circumstances.

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