How do you treat your Hair Loss? - BaldTruthTalk.com
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  1. #1
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    Default How do you treat your Hair Loss?

    I am 28 and thinning out rapidly. What medications work for y'all? Any side effects with those medications?

  2. #2
    Member JustJoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krbkrb View Post
    I am 28 and thinning out rapidly. What medications work for y'all? Any side effects with those medications?
    Propecia, yes it worked well. Very well!

    Yes, I had side effects that are not bothersome to me. I'll let others discuss the side effects because mine are kind of personal.

  3. #3
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    I used Propecia for over a year. Then tried Proscar for about 4-6 months. I didn't experience any side effects. I didn't get any regrowth either so I stopped taking Propecia/Proscar.

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    Quote Originally Posted by krbkrb View Post
    I am 28 and thinning out rapidly. What medications work for y'all? Any side effects with those medications?
    Hey KrbKrb,

    As always, I have to state clearly that I am not a physician and that my opinions and knowledge concerning hair loss and its treatment are based on extensive research and reporting on the subject as a consumer advocate and hair loss educator.

    I’d like to start by making it clear that the vast majority of advertised hair loss "treatments" DO NOT work for the prevention and treatment of hair loss. If a hair loss treatment is not approved by the FDA or recommended by The American Hair Loss Association, chances are you are wasting your precious time and money. Remember that the successful treatment of hair loss is greatly dependent on early intervention. It is critical to begin treatment with an effective product as soon as you notice the onset of your hair loss, or as soon a possible.

    Currently the most effective and widely prescribed treatment for male pattern hair loss is Finasteride.

    Finasteride is the generic name for the brand name drugs Proscar and Propecia. Finasteride was originally developed by Merck and Co. as a drug to treat enlarged prostate glands. On December 22, 1997 the FDA approved a 1mg dose of finasteride for the treatment of androgenic alopecia (male pattern baldness) in men. Propecia is the first drug in history to effectively treat male pattern baldness in the vast majority of men who use it.

    How Propecia Works:

    Finasteride's hair-raising success is due to its ability to specifically inhibit Type II 5-alpha-reductace, the enzyme that converts testosterone into the byproduct androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Propecia's 1 mg dose of finasteride can effectively lower DHT levels by as much as 60% when taken daily. It is DHT that shrinks or miniaturizes the hair follicle, which eventually leads to baldness. This 60% reduction in DHT has proven to stop the progression of hair loss in 86% of men taking the drug during clinical trials. 65% of trial participants experienced what was considered a substantial increase in hair growth.

    At this point, in my opinion, the only truly effective medically proven way to arrest the hair loss process is to lower DHT levels. The American Hair Loss Association recommends finasteride as the first line of attack for all men interested in treating their male pattern baldness.

    98% of men taking Propecia had no side effects. Clinical tests show Propecia is very well tolerated. A small number of men (1.8%) experience some sexual side effects. 1.3% reported erectile dysfunction. Other listed side effects include, decreased libido (1.8%), decreased volume of ejaculate (0.8%), impotence (less than one percent), and breast tenderness or enlargement (less than one percent).

    During clinical trials all side effects were eliminated if the drug was discontinued. These side effects also went away in about 65% of those who continued treatment, meaning that they are transient in most individuals.

    Many physicians believe that a combination of Propecia and 5% minoxidil is good approach when considering medical treatment. While minoxidil has been clinically proven to slow the progression of hair loss and regrow some hair, most informed experts see it as a marginally effective drug in the fight against hair loss. Since minoxidil has no effect on the hormonal process of hair loss, its positive effects are at best temporary, and usually yield somewhat disappointing long-term results.

    I’m not a big fan of the kitchen sink approach to treating hair loss. In my opinion, I think it’s best to try one treatment at a time in order to accurately assess the results. You can always add a second treatment if you’re not doing as well as you’d like with the first. I hate to see guys taking something, and not really knowing whether or not it’s benefiting them. It’s difficult to know what’s working when you're using more than one medication.


    Hope this helps.

    Spencer Kobren
    Spencer Kobren
    Founder, American Hair Loss Association
    Host, The Bald Truth Radio Show

    I am not a physician. My opinions and knowledge concerning hair loss and its treatment are based on extensive research and reporting on the subject as a consumer advocate and hair loss educator. My views and comments on the subject should not be taken as medical advice. Always seek the advice of a medical professional when considering medical and surgical treatment.

  5. #5
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    Default Any thoughts regarding IGF-1

    Howdy everybody!

    I ran across a lot of current information regarding IGF-1 (or insulin-like growth factor 1) and the treatment of hairloss on PubMed.com
    Researchers used a 0.01% solution of capsacin (yes, the chemical that makes chili peppers hot) and applied it to the scalp of thinning men. After 5 or six months those taking capsacin experienced a decent ammount of regrowth while the placebo group regressed. They relate the hair growth to the increase of dermal IGF-1 in the scalp. They have also discovered that raspberry ketones (the chemical that gives raspberries their distinctive smell) also increases IGF-1 levels in the scalp, but by a different route than capsacin. As the men involved in the studies were taking no other medications for hair loss, one can only conclude that IGF-1 had the desired effect. As for me, I use capsacin and raspberry ketones mixed with 5% Rogaine foam 2x per day and only in the vertex. As I have only been doing this for a month now, it is way to early to see anything. I will keep everyone posted either good or bad. I figure I'll try just about anything since both Propecia AND Avodart had no effect.

    Go to http://www.pubmed.gov and do a keyword search on raspberry ketones
    and hair loss as well as capsacin and hair loss to get the results.

    -Tom.

  6. #6
    Senior Member PayDay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteinbergerXL2 View Post
    Howdy everybody!

    I ran across a lot of current information regarding IGF-1 (or insulin-like growth factor 1) and the treatment of hairloss on PubMed.com
    Researchers used a 0.01% solution of capsacin (yes, the chemical that makes chili peppers hot) and applied it to the scalp of thinning men. After 5 or six months those taking capsacin experienced a decent ammount of regrowth while the placebo group regressed. They relate the hair growth to the increase of dermal IGF-1 in the scalp. They have also discovered that raspberry ketones (the chemical that gives raspberries their distinctive smell) also increases IGF-1 levels in the scalp, but by a different route than capsacin. As the men involved in the studies were taking no other medications for hair loss, one can only conclude that IGF-1 had the desired effect. As for me, I use capsacin and raspberry ketones mixed with 5% Rogaine foam 2x per day and only in the vertex. As I have only been doing this for a month now, it is way to early to see anything. I will keep everyone posted either good or bad. I figure I'll try just about anything since both Propecia AND Avodart had no effect.

    Go to http://www.pubmed.gov and do a keyword search on raspberry ketones
    and hair loss as well as capsacin and hair loss to get the results.

    -Tom.
    Hi SteinbergerXL2,
    Propecia has done well by me over the years, but I am always looking for something to give me an extra boost.The texture of my hair ins not too great.
    Rogaine really irritated my scalp so I don't use it anymore, but was considering trying the foam. Can you purchase the capsacin and raspberry ketones in some sort of solution? Do you have to prepare the mix somehow? And How do you know how much to use?

    Sound promising. I'd like to give it a try.

  7. #7
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    Default Response to raspberry Ketones / Capsacin Question

    Well Howdy!

    Both the Capsacin and raspberry ketones are easy to buy. The capsacin comes as an over-the-counter preparation called Capsazin that you can buy in any CVS Pharmacy or supermarket. It is a liquid capsacin-based pain relieving liquid that is 0.15% capsacin. It is 15 times more concentrated than what the pubmed study used, which was only 0.1%. As for me I squeeze 10 drops into the cap and apply it directly to my thinning crown after I completely rub in the Rogaine Foam. As for the raspberry ketones, you can get a 10-gram container for $5.50 at Nutraplanet.com. They charge $12 for
    2-day shipping. I have not yet tried the Raspberry Ketones as I have my first order comming tomorrow. My plan is to use 1/4 teaspoon, which is equivalant to 200mg of RK. I figure just a dash of hot water to liquify the RK then add 10drops of capsacin. They both raise IGF-1 levels considerably, but by different mechanisms. If i am not mistaken, RK is fat soluable, but there is oil in the capsacin which may allow for absorption, as well as a small ammount of propylene glycol which will definately allow for absorbtion. Both products are completely safe, as is Rogaine Foam, so i feel confident trying it myself or reccomending it to others. Just be SURE to wash your hands after applying the capsacin because it is essentially mace (the pepper spray) and you DON'T want to touch your eyes. Believe me, I know....

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