Closed Thread
Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 53
  1. #11
    Senior Member BaldinLikeBaldwin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    222

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by yeahyeahyeah View Post
    Dont over do it mate.

    Remember cosmetic surgery is just there to improve your existing features, rather then completely change the way you look.
    you are right, thank you for the advice

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,801

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BaldinLikeBaldwin View Post
    you are right, thank you for the advice
    And just so I forget , you may feel the same mentally after you ops.

    At least thats how I feel after my own operation. Thankfully, a few friends have been honest and complimenting me.

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
    Posts
    1,258

    Default

    Thanks for the pics yeahyeahyeah. Good transformations there. I personally feel relatively happy with my face. It's my hair that bothers me, which is why I'm set to do something about it!

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,801

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander View Post
    A lot of those pictures looked like they had a sliding genioplasty performed / some bimaxillary protrusions corrected. I thought you didn't have that, or was I wrong?

    I'm going to see a surgeon about correcting some flaws of mine. So far this is what I've worked out:

    1. The important things to solve in the first operation will be my jawline/chin in profile, along with correcting a potentially minor bimaxillary protrusion (maybe the weaker chin just makes it look this way, so I'll need to speak with the doctor about this)

    2. I want to change the angle and size of my nose slightly in profile, along with MAYBE making the tip a little bit smaller. I'd also like to increase the prominence of my cheekbones.

    Part one will need to be the first operation I think, as based on my research changing the jawline and things can dramatically affect how your nose then looks. So it would make more sense to wait until post-op and the swelling has gone down before I go ahead and make further changes.

    My main concerns coming out of post op and looking dramatically different, although that's unlikely when we're talking about work mainly affecting my appearance in profile. I think having it done in two stages too is a bit better, as when people see me for the first time they won't think much, just probably a "Well I haven't seen him in a while, and he's looking a lot better" but can't pin point exactly what has changed. Then the second operation would be a bit later and work on defining my face more, focusing on the nose and cheeks.

    All of this I'm wanting to achieve without the use of implants. So that would mean things like the aforementioned sliding genioplasty. My only concerns will be how this affects things if I ever want to get revision surgery done.
    1) You generally cant get a nose job until 6 months after the jaw operation because as you say the shape changes.

    When they expand your upper jaw, your nose gets 1-2 mm wider.

    2) Even without geinoplasty there is a visible change. In these cases the chin looks better because the bite is better e.g. if you have an underbite, the teeth slide infront of your top teeth, giving a weak hagged apperance.

    3) Honestly, most people may not notice UNLESS you show them before and after photos. But there will be a few that will.

    For example from the front of my face, my nose, chin jaw is very straight like a bullet.

    And yeah I had a bimaxillary protrusion. My chin was off centre by 5 mm.

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,801

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander View Post
    With the bimaxillary protrusion, your mouth has therefore been sticking out your whole life, so to speak. When they reduce the protrusion what then happens regarding the skin around the mouth and the lips? Do they need to re-adjust that?

    How major was fixing your protrusion? Were you able to fix it with orthodontic work alone (braces), or did they need to cut the bone and re-adjust the entire upper- and lower-jaws?

    Regarding people noticing, provided I can hide long enough during the recovery process (how long because I'm back walking around looking and talking kind of normal?), then nobody will notice. I suppose that's the advantage of living abroad where people only see me on webcam and visit maybe twice a year.

    Edit: Is there any medical reason to correct a bimaxillary protrusion? If I can somehow find a reason then I won't need to pay for the operation out of my own pocket. I did also read that having a weak chin leads to a saggy face early on due to a lack of support or something. Your thoughts are welcome.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Prognathism3.png

    Wait, I had a Mandibular prognathism and open bite.

    Anyway, a few things, if say they reset your jaw bone, which is very likely if you have a bite deformity:

    1) I am in my 6th week, but I am STILL swollen. They will probably make you wear rubber bands in order to keep the position of your bite which you have to change regularly, until the actual jaw bone heals.

    2) You will be on liquids for a good 4 weeks. So go to the gym and work out, I have lost 14 pounds. Now , 5th - 6th week I am on soft foods.

    3) Your soft tissue, skin and all of that is not really affected. It moulds around how the jaw bone is shifted. Wont worry about anything.

    4) I got my operation done on the national health service, and it was free luckily, but I know if you had to pay for it you are looking at 10k.

    5) Braces cannot fix deformities of the jaw, like what you described.

    It can only fix teeth, and the position of it in your mouth by straightening it.

    Only surgery moves the jaw around.

    6) Changes to expect, better symmetry, and if they do your lower jaw - a more firmer, defined jawline.

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,801

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander View Post
    Thanks for that, you're a big help. What about any possible medical reasons? However loose they may be. I'll take anything you've got!
    For why the procedure is not cosmetic?

    Yeah - there are a lot of functional reasons why you should get it sorted out.

    "The purpose of orthognathic surgery is to correct functional and esthetic problems that are due to underlying skeletal deformities. Why is it important to correct a bad bite? Severe malocclusion (bad bite) may cause many functional problems. You may have already experienced some of the following: inability to chew food properly which compromises digestion; speech problems; facial dysfunction characterized by headaches, joint pain, and periodontal trauma. Orthognathic surgery is also an important part of the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea."

    I could never bite into apples either.

    Thats why it is being done on the NHS for severe cases.

    What you have to remember - the ONLY reason why you look better after this is done, because everything is where it should be 'naturally'. So ironically, it is not cosmetic surgery in its purest sense, rather, you are correcting an abnormality.

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,801

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander View Post
    I din't know if this is something I should speak to my parents about or not. Even though I live alone and all that, I know that if there was a semi-valid reason then they would pay for all of it. They didn't hesitate to get me braces and that cost over 15k.

    I think I'll go and have some consultations first before speaking with them. By the way, I'm looking at going with Prof Mommaerts in Belgium at this point. I think he's one of the best, if not the best at this kind of stuff. Have you heard of him before?
    Nope. I never picked my surgeon to be honest.

    If I were you - I would just get it done.

    At the very least it will give you are very good smile, by having a great bite, and that is attractive. But I do think your appearance will improve. I look very different to before I had anything done. +2 on the looks scale. My friends are commenting.

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,801

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander View Post
    Well first I need to go and talk to my dentist. My jaw/bite is not even at the moment. It looks symmetrical and everything, but when I bite down it only touches on one side, which makes chewing hard as I can only eat on one side, otherwise I'd grind my teeth.

    I'm not sure if this is a dental problem or a jaw problem. Mind you it's also somewhat recent.

    As much as I want to "just get it done" I don't want to live with any regrets, and am prepared to pay for the best. Of course, if my parents are the ones doing the paying that would be even better (lol).
    Get this done over a hair transplant.

    Looking at old photos when I was a NW0, the jaw ****ed everything up. And if anything made me rely more on my hair to look presentable.

    And by the sounds of it sounds like you have a bite problem. i.e. jaw. ...If one side does not touch, it means that your bite is not in the correct position , hence you can't 'bite' properly.

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,801

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander View Post
    Hair transplant is at the bottom of my surgery list. I'm getting this facial work done first.

    Obviously you're not a doctor, but would this "bite problem" require jaw surgery?
    Yes, that is how they normally fix the bites.

  10. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    3,103

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by clandestine View Post
    Highlander is literally retarded.
    Retarded is not a good way to put it, but he is very sick minded - and seldom right about anything.

    These are photos of people with birth defects of varying degrees. It is just wrong to use them to draw comparisons about hereditary hair loss.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

» IAHRS

hair transplant surgeons

» The Bald Truth

» Recent Threads

Do NOT Have a Hair Transplant!!!
09-26-2016 04:30 PM
Last Post By Driver
Today 07:17 PM
Post Finasteride Syndrome (Theory)
09-24-2016 10:02 PM
Last Post By burtandernie
Today 06:48 PM
My Dermatologist told me I was thinning at my Temples.
09-26-2016 03:24 PM
Last Post By burtandernie
Today 06:43 PM
ruxolitinib
09-22-2016 11:37 AM
by ducu72
Last Post By beetee
Today 05:11 PM
cutting up 5m fin?? seems so small lol
09-24-2016 07:45 PM
Last Post By pkipling
Today 04:55 PM