The Tide is Turning - BaldTruthTalk.com
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  1. #1
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    Default The Tide is Turning

    Caught the show last night and thought it was very interesting to hear that the tide is turning and the demand is in fue, not strip and not tattooing. Plenty have been saying this for years so why is that so many in the industry are just now realizing it. It’s not that they didn’t know they just could not admit it and it all comes down to money. Maybe some believe they can offer it with robotic type devices so now its okay to say it but once again they can’t get away from this greed for money. It’s the slow laborious method of FUE with small hand punches in the right hands that is always the best choice. But not everyone can pick up this skill nor is laborious work as good for a doctor's ego or pocketbook so expect the lies to continue.


    Yes I actually got an e-mail from the network forum banning me 2 years ago. I was told that my promotion of fue was considered very dangerous. Just take a look at them now. Guess what, they are not working for you.

  2. #2
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    I was viewing the show as well. I guess this may mean that FUEs will be STRONGLY focused on by the medical hair repair industry.
    "robotic type devices" will probably be greatly utilized as you have suggested. This Website is NECESSARY for those that may consider FUE work being done for unbiased reviews of the clinics/Doctors getting involved.

  3. #3
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    FUE will be the focus of the hair transplant industry in general as now many feel it might be safe to get into it without destroying their business regardless of if you are a repair patient or have a virgin scalp. I would strongly suggest the small hand punch in skilled hands as the only option here. Trust me there are more than a few clinics taking this approach but not many everyone should make their own choice as I could give a rat’s ass about where someone goes. What I am concerned with is that they have the smallest procedure as possible maybe as few as 100 fue as you really can’t trust anyone on these forums or in this business. Mechanization is only about profit and does not benefit the patient in anyway.

    And by the way quadruple bypass surgery, chemotherapy and Acell does not heal the body, nutrition heals the body but there is no money in that.

  4. #4
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    Hey Arista I grew up on the Southside of Chicago about 2 blocks from Midway airport. About 8 blocks in the other direction on the corner of 60th and Pulaski there was a small candy shop that one of my friends took me to as we were riding our bikes back in 1974 Dove Candies. I never knew it was there until that day and what I had was something I will never forget. It was the most incredible ice cream bar I have ever tasted in my life. It was made in small batches and hand dipped in dark chocolate. It was so incredible that the Mars candy bar company bought the rights to it from the owner Leo Stefanos in 1985.

    I bought a box of those same Dove bars about 2 years ago. They are now mass produced with only profit in mind. The bar tasted like complete shit and I could taste the artificial ingredients and what mass producing has done to something that was handmade and of superior quality. This is what happens with mechanization and mass production you get shit if you have any doubts just take a trip to Wal-Mart. Who knows maybe they will start offering hair transplants too.

  5. #5
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    This isn't a new phenomenon Arista. From what I have been seeing on the forums, the tide actually tuned a while ago. I think there's a huge misconception as to why these mechanical devices are being used and developed for FUE and I don't believe it's because it automates the procedure. As long as the doctor is still performing the extractions, the extractions will probably take just as long if not a little longer because these things need to be constantly calibrated from what I have read. I think taking certain human weaknesses out of the equation, like fatigue or eyestrain only benefits people.

    Look at Dr. Cole. He can do manual FUE probably better than anybody and apparently trained most the the doctors who are still doing manual FUE, but he chooses to use a mechanical device that he developed. Do you think he does it just because it might make his life a little easier? He can probably extract 3000 grafts a day by hand with no problem. Do you think it takes him any less time to extract using his device? I doubt it.



    Quote Originally Posted by Artista View Post
    I was viewing the show as well. I guess this may mean that FUEs will be STRONGLY focused on by the medical hair repair industry.
    "robotic type devices" will probably be greatly utilized as you have suggested. This Website is NECESSARY for those that may consider FUE work being done for unbiased reviews of the clinics/Doctors getting involved.

  6. #6
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    Yeah sure I will believe a doctor that canít quite get his story straight. Let me know when you guys get into the chair before you start speaking so highly of something. Maybe start paying attention when you do listen to the show as I donít need a history lesson about Atlanta. I have spoken to enough patients and ex-employees plus my own interactions over the years to know when I donít like someone regardless of how good or bad their work happens to be.

    You guys are still wet behind the ears and donít even know it and your giving advice. And if you donít know what Iím writing about than maybe you need a hair transplant industry decoder ring.

  7. #7
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    Anyone that has worked long enough with tools knows that some require the sense of touch while using them and others requires a keen sense of hearing to know when itís being done right. With the heavy duty Black and Decker you lose that aspect so when posters have posted in the past that the doctor destroyed their donor with the Black and Decker maybe they know more than you do. How about trying to search some history before you become an expert.

  8. #8
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    I had both manual and CIT done on me and noticed no time difference in the two. I have also noticed no cosmetic difference to date. That being said, In my past trade, I used both a hand saw and skill worm drive. They both had had purpose but at the end off the day, my arm wasn't falling off using the skill. Not to mention, the cuts were cleaner regardless of teeth. Fatigue does play a role. As fatigue sets in, no one can tell me there isn't a drop off in quality. No ones going to tell me that an O.D .90 mm punch done manually is going to create a cleaner better cut than the same O.D punch spinning at 300 rpm. Even if the surgeon is comfortable and competent using the tool of his choice, it's still his experience and skilled hand that is the most important factor.

    Top, I'm surprised you even ate that new Dove bar.... You know how bad dairy is on the digestive system. Not to mention all those preservatives! what happened to garbage in, garbage out!

  9. #9
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    Great points! I totally agree!

    Quote Originally Posted by northeastguy View Post
    I had both manual and CIT done on me and noticed no time difference in the two. I have also noticed no cosmetic difference to date. That being said, In my past trade, I used both a hand saw and skill worm drive. They both had had purpose but at the end off the day, my arm wasn't falling off using the skill. Not to mention, the cuts were cleaner regardless of teeth. Fatigue does play a role. As fatigue sets in, no one can tell me there isn't a drop off in quality. No ones going to tell me that an O.D .90 mm punch done manually is going to create a cleaner better cut than the same O.D punch spinning at 300 rpm. Even if the surgeon is comfortable and competent using the tool of his choice, it's still his experience and skilled hand that is the most important factor.

    Top, I'm surprised you even ate that new Dove bar.... You know how bad dairy is on the digestive system. Not to mention all those preservatives! what happened to garbage in, garbage out!

  10. #10
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    NEguy a rare moment of weakness...............lol..............the original bar was a very fond memory, it was incredible.

    Anyway it has also been my experience that extremely dark chocolate I normally eat 100% is somewhat of a superfood.The epicatechin is one of the most potent stimuli for mitochondrial biogenesis ever discovered, so I guess I was rationalizing.

    I would also add that I have had many comment on my ability to maintain full power strike combinaitons on the heavy bag regardless of if it is round 1 or round 15, most just can't seem to figure it out. It's called years of repitition where fatigue no longer becomes as much of an issue.

    And when I do eat dairy it is always raw from Amish farmers that come into the area. Raw milk to make yogurt, straight raw cream and raw butter.

    For my recovery after surgery I will be eating a minimum of 12 raw eggs per day and let's not forget that liver.

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