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varonil
01-13-2009, 07:41 AM
I got a transplant when I was 20 (1995) to stop my receding hairline. The doctor said the scar it would leave would hardly be noticeable and of course I was desperate to halt my hair loss. After awaiting the result I knew I was duped because the new hair on the front of my scalp was thin and wiry, and I had a bigger scar then expected. My confidence (and luck) with women has been devastated ever since.

I would have shaved my head years ago but do not want to "advertise" my hair transplant because for me that would be like advertising the insecurity I had about baldness. Like it was something so horrible that it merrited disfiguring surgery. It is a double edged sword because I'm attractive to women when my head is buzzed but the shorter I shave my head of course the more apparent the scar.

I still think shaving my head is the best way to go because my hair loss is quite extensive and therefore I understand I'm not the best candidate for more transplants. I've read many threads on scar reduction techniques, but nothing that seems it will make the scar invisible. Therefore I'm wondering what other victims of strip scarring transplants who have elected to shave their heads are doing to overcome the scar stigma. When people inevitably ask what happened what do you tell them? Does anyone have a great excuse? If you told the truth to friends, relatives and colleagues, how did people react?

Cheers,

Adam

SpencerKobren
01-13-2009, 02:23 PM
I got a transplant when I was 20 (1995) to stop my receding hairline. The doctor said the scar it would leave would hardly be noticeable and of course I was desperate to halt my hair loss. After awaiting the result I knew I was duped because the new hair on the front of my scalp was thin and wiry, and I had a bigger scar then expected. My confidence (and luck) with women has been devastated ever since.

I would have shaved my head years ago but do not want to "advertise" my hair transplant because for me that would be like advertising the insecurity I had about baldness. Like it was something so horrible that it merrited disfiguring surgery. It is a double edged sword because I'm attractive to women when my head is buzzed but the shorter I shave my head of course the more apparent the scar.

I still think shaving my head is the best way to go because my hair loss is quite extensive and therefore I understand I'm not the best candidate for more transplants. I've read many threads on scar reduction techniques, but nothing that seems it will make the scar invisible. Therefore I'm wondering what other victims of strip scarring transplants who have elected to shave their heads are doing to overcome the scar stigma. When people inevitably ask what happened what do you tell them? Does anyone have a great excuse? If you told the truth to friends, relatives and colleagues, how did people react?

Cheers,

Adam
Hey Adam,

Welcome to the forum. You'll hear me say this or write this again and again, but the truth is... you are not alone. Dealing with a poor result from cosmetic surgery is not easy, especially when it something as visible to the world as a bad hair transplant. There are thousands of men in your exact position, many of whom have simply retreated from living a normal productive life. This does not have to happen to you!

Let me ask you this, does the transplanted area look reasonably normal? Can you buzz or shave the area without any tell tale signs of a bad hair transplant?

If this is the case,then you are in a better position than many,and can most likely be helped.

Here's a good article written by IAHRS Member Bessam Farjo, MD

http://hairloss.iahrs.org/hair-transplant/making-a-hair-transplant-scar-less-visible/

Laserhead
01-13-2009, 02:46 PM
I don't to think you have anything to be ashamed of. If strangers ask just tell them that you had a motorcycle accident of something. I don't think people will know exactly what the scar is when they see it. I don't think most people can recognize that it is a scar from a hair transplant. Unless you hang with all hair transplant patients then I think you're fine:) You should call the show and ask Spencer how he would handle it.

I should be ashamed to have been stupid enough to be swindled by the laser scam!:(

tbtadmin
01-13-2009, 04:32 PM
I got a transplant when I was 20 (1995) to stop my receding hairline. The doctor said the scar it would leave would hardly be noticeable and of course I was desperate to halt my hair loss. After awaiting the result I knew I was duped because the new hair on the front of my scalp was thin and wiry, and I had a bigger scar then expected. My confidence (and luck) with women has been devastated ever since.

I would have shaved my head years ago but do not want to "advertise" my hair transplant because for me that would be like advertising the insecurity I had about baldness. Like it was something so horrible that it merrited disfiguring surgery. It is a double edged sword because I'm attractive to women when my head is buzzed but the shorter I shave my head of course the more apparent the scar.

I still think shaving my head is the best way to go because my hair loss is quite extensive and therefore I understand I'm not the best candidate for more transplants. I've read many threads on scar reduction techniques, but nothing that seems it will make the scar invisible. Therefore I'm wondering what other victims of strip scarring transplants who have elected to shave their heads are doing to overcome the scar stigma. When people inevitably ask what happened what do you tell them? Does anyone have a great excuse? If you told the truth to friends, relatives and colleagues, how did people react?

Cheers,

Adam

Additional articles that may help you:

Looking For Options To Conceal My Hair Transplant Scar So I Can Shave My Head (http://hairloss.iahrs.org/hair-transplant/conceal-scar-shave-head/)

How Can I Minimize The Visibility of My Hair Transplant Scar? (http://hairloss.iahrs.org/hair-transplant/scar-visibility-hair-transplant/)

Hair Transplant Strip Scar - Can It Be Repaired? (http://hairloss.iahrs.org/hair-transplant/hair-transplant-strip-scar/)

varonil
01-14-2009, 01:49 AM
Hi Spencer,

The transplanted area runs along the front left and right of my original (high school) hairline. I've just started shaving it as the hair has thinned out in between and so this front strip of wiry hair looks unnatural. I would say its not highly visible, but when light shines on it the shaved transplanted area looks cobbly (a pattern of little evenly spaced bumps). I can probably live with this but do hope to have the plugs pulled here too. Is that possible?

I've attached a pic of my scar with my head buzzed pretty short.

Cheers


Hey Adam,

Welcome to the forum. You'll hear me say this or write this again and again, but the truth is... you are not alone. Dealing with a poor result from cosmetic surgery is not easy, especially when it something as visible to the world as a bad hair transplant. There are thousands of men in your exact position, many of whom have simply retreated from living a normal productive life. This does not have to happen to you!

Let me ask you this, does the transplanted area look reasonably normal? Can you buzz or shave the area without any tell tale signs of a bad hair transplant?

If this is the case,then you are in a better position than many,and can most likely be helped.

Here's a good article written by IAHRS Member Bessam Farjo, MD

http://hairloss.iahrs.org/hair-transplant/making-a-hair-transplant-scar-less-visible/

SpencerKobren
01-14-2009, 11:15 AM
The good news it that the old "plugs can be removed. If the cobble stoning is not too bad there's a good possibly of significantly improving the appearance of the skin with laser skin resurfacing. In some cases the skin can appear completely normal again.

Your scar is pretty typical and uniform. It doesn't look like there was any significant strechback, so I think you're in good shape as far as the possibility of concealing it.

While there are no guarantees that all grafts will grow in scar tissue, it is possible to significantly lessen the appearance of the scar or break it up with a small fue procedure. In some cases the scar is completely camouflaged.

Check out Bigmac's blog. He recently had some fue work done to improve his scars.

http://www.baldtruthtalk.com/blog.php?b=21

gillenator
01-16-2009, 01:43 PM
Hi Adam,

Please allow me to first say thank you for sharing your story and picture with us. I and probably many others appreciate your transparency because every case adds to the knowledge base of what can be potentially done in the repair arena.

You had your procedure at a very transitional time in the HT industry. I remember it well because I started researching and following the field in 1980 before the internet was even around. I must sound like a dinasour! Anyways, in 1995, there was still alot of open donor work (plugs) being done however the more progressive doctors had already been transitioning into the micro-mini technology. Instead of using punching out plug grafts from the donor, they began to dissect an actual linear strip of scalp tissue and then had surgey techs dissect that strip under magnification. No one was using scopes back then so to dissect the strip into follicular units was near impossible if not impossible altogethor. Too much transection would occur. Micro's were two and three hair grafts, and minnis were four plus hair grafts. Still not very natural appearing on the hairline. I wonder if that's what you had done.

Still in that time period, closing the area after the strip specimen was excised, closure methods were in their infancy and IMHO, did not improve until later into the late 90's and into the turn of the century did improved closure methods like the double-closure technique improve the probability of keeping the scar from stretching so much. Elasticity was not an issue for punch out grafts so quite frankly, HT docotrs did not experience their patients having scar stretch back until they started the strip methods. From my observation, I doubt that you had a double closure method. You must have had a fairly large session because the scar goes ear-to-ear which was somewhat rare back then. I was used to seeing guys with shorter, wider scars from that time period. It was not until after many men ended up with wide scars that the industry realized that elastcity is a major factor regarding potential scar stretchback so many docs began to take the strip thinner and longer. I think one of the main reasons docs took wide strips was because it was easier to dissect into grafts that way. As I said no one used microscopes to dissect back then. It was more cutting tissue, not microsopic dissection like the tops docs use today.

Sorry for my rambling of history. Back to your case. Start researching online the docs with the best reputations for repair work. IMHO, most of them will either want to extract the large grafts in your hairline for two reasons. They are too low situated on your hairline now that you are 34 years old and not getting younger. The second reason is that they are too large of grafts because natural hairlines commence in single hair FU's.

Some may recommend that you begin scalp stretching exercises to extend laxity to do a potential scar revision to make the linear scar much thinner. Then they may want you to come back after complete healing to do a FUE into the scar follow up session. You would be amazed at the end result. I have seen it done many times. Not every case is the same however. What is the implication? You need a reputable doc proven in repair work who is skilled and experienced in both strip AND FUE. It may very well take a combination of methods to bring about the best cosmetic result in your case.

That leads to my last recommendation. Get examined in person once you have narrowed your final selection of repair docs. Scap laxity cannot be tested through pics as you already know. It is difficult to get a gauge on the level of exisitng blood flow/supply in the scar area withoput seeing the area in person. See what I mean? That's why it may be more advantageous to remove dead scar tissue with a scar revision before implanting FUE grafts into the area at a later date. Improving the blood supply to the area can and will improve the chance of graft survival. The more hair that will grow in the scar, the better chance of disguising or camouflaging it.

One of the realities of getting a HT is the fact that we may not be able to buzz our hair extremely short in the future. Our scalps will never be the same as it was before the procedure.

I think you have some good potential to improve the area visually speaking though. Best wishes to you Adam!

Last c

varonil
01-18-2009, 11:42 AM
Dear Gillenator,

I really appreciate your thoughtful note, and the historic background info on the development of HT techniques. How I wish I would have waited a while longer.. but I was young and "the sky was falling on me" because of hairloss. Being out on a mining site is reason for my delayed reply.

There's a little more to my story. Slightly after the picture was taken I did go to a Dr. Jones (Oakville, Canada) who said he could reduce my scar by about 75% with FUE implants into it. His opinion was that a scar revision had a significant probability of stretching back out. They said they just happened to have an opening the next day (as opposed to a long wait) so I took it. I had 150 grafts put into the scar; that was October 23rd, 2008. I must say the scar does appear a little smaller to me now, but it certainly hasn't diminished 75%. Dr. Jones said to check in with him in March so I will give it some more time.

From what I can gather Dr. Jones seems to have a good reputation and gets a lot of publicity from talks and articles he gives. I will however research other options for additional procedures.

Do you know if having had FUE implants would complicate me from having a scar revision? I guess one good way to find out and get an opinion from another highly reputable doctor.

gillenator
01-20-2009, 04:45 PM
Dear Gillenator,

I really appreciate your thoughtful note, and the historic background info on the development of HT techniques. How I wish I would have waited a while longer.. but I was young and "the sky was falling on me" because of hairloss. Being out on a mining site is reason for my delayed reply.

There's a little more to my story. Slightly after the picture was taken I did go to a Dr. Jones (Oakville, Canada) who said he could reduce my scar by about 75% with FUE implants into it. His opinion was that a scar revision had a significant probability of stretching back out. They said they just happened to have an opening the next day (as opposed to a long wait) so I took it. I had 150 grafts put into the scar; that was October 23rd, 2008. I must say the scar does appear a little smaller to me now, but it certainly hasn't diminished 75%. Dr. Jones said to check in with him in March so I will give it some more time.

From what I can gather Dr. Jones seems to have a good reputation and gets a lot of publicity from talks and articles he gives. I will however research other options for additional procedures.

Do you know if having had FUE implants would complicate me from having a scar revision? I guess one good way to find out and get an opinion from another highly reputable doctor.

You're very welcome. Let's back up for a moment. When the term "reducing" is used, it implies just that. That the scar tissue will be reduced, meaning partially removed. Did Dr. Jones test your elasticity and then determine that you were too tight for a revision?

I just find it highly suspect when he tells you there just happens to be an opening "the next day". If he had done a scar revision, you have to heal first before any grafts are inplanted in what is remaining. In other words, there is no way they can charge you for any grafts when they cannot implant any. Having a scar revison and then FUE grafts added later is a two stage scenario. See what I mean?

Not that I am accusing him of anything, but there's probably not much income in doing just a revision and nothing else.

Having you do scalp stretching exercises for six months or so could have potentially created enough laxity (play in the scalp) to remove some scar tissue. I think that more than anything would have given you the best cosmetic repair result and a much thinner scar to start adding grafts to. I mean you could have started scalp stretching and then let's say in six months, no laxity was gained, then I could see his point much better. But anyone who has dark hair against a light complexion is going to have a much more difficult time camouflaging the scar. IMHO, it is impossible to camoflauge a scar by 70% with that wide of a color contrast. You don't have to be a licensed physician to see that!

But I guess it's easy for a lay person like me to be suspect since I am not a doctor and never performed a scar revision. My opinion however is based on 29 years of clinical observations in this industry. I just feel IMHO that it would have been better to at least see if in fact a scar revision would have worked after trying the stretching exercises.

Also, did he discuss different closing methods with you which can greatly help to prevent scar stretchback before getting you in the next day for FUE?

Zao
01-20-2009, 06:15 PM
I would run for the hills if a doctor all of a sudden had an opening for me the next day after a consultation. This smells like desperation to me for some easy cash. I hope things work out for you, but I don't like this doctors tactics. Sounds VERY sleazy to me. Sounds like he took advantage of your desperation.

Steven Gabel, MD
01-23-2009, 10:25 AM
Adam

Thank you for posting your situation on the forum, which will hopefully provide you with some options and educate others who are in the same boat as you. There are a multitude of reasons why people develop poor results at the donor area from a patientís own intrinsic ability to heal to the technique that was used to harvest and close the incision. Unfortunately, some people are just more prone to scar then others.

One question I have for you Ė do you have any other scars or incision sites on your body that have healed well or not healed well? I ask this because if you were to have a scar revision (which gillenator was referring to in doing the scalp exercises to increase your elasticity and remove the scar) I would like to know if your body tends to form larger then normal scars. If that is the case, you have to be very careful to excising the scar as you may end up in the same spot you are in now. If you do heal well after a cut or prior surgical incision, then reducing the scar as much as possible prior to FUE may be in your best interest. Also, did you have FUE done in the entire scar or just a portion of it? You should monitor the results from the FUE into the scar very closely to see if it grows or not.

Steven Gabel, M.D.
Portland, Oregon
www.gabelcenter.com (http://www.gabelcenter.com)

gillenator
01-23-2009, 11:53 AM
Adam

Thank you for posting your situation on the forum, which will hopefully provide you with some options and educate others who are in the same boat as you. There are a multitude of reasons why people develop poor results at the donor area from a patientís own intrinsic ability to heal to the technique that was used to harvest and close the incision. Unfortunately, some people are just more prone to scar then others.

One question I have for you Ė do you have any other scars or incision sites on your body that have healed well or not healed well? I ask this because if you were to have a scar revision (which gillenator was referring to in doing the scalp exercises to increase your elasticity and remove the scar) I would like to know if your body tends to form larger then normal scars. If that is the case, you have to be very careful to excising the scar as you may end up in the same spot you are in now. If you do heal well after a cut or prior surgical incision, then reducing the scar as much as possible prior to FUE may be in your best interest. Also, did you have FUE done in the entire scar or just a portion of it? You should monitor the results from the FUE into the scar very closely to see if it grows or not.

Steven Gabel, M.D.
Portland, Oregon
www.gabelcenter.com (http://www.gabelcenter.com)

Thank you Dr. Gabel for your input and the additional points that you made regarding how a patient heals from cuts and lacerations. I remember when I used to work inside the clinic and insisting on having that area evaluation included in the patient's medical history.

In fact, as you no doubt are aware of, some darker pigmented patients can have a disposition to healing with raised scars (keyloiding). Not all but enough to want to discuss this with the patient before making any final decisions about moving forward with surgery. It should be covered with every patient IMHO.

Again, we do not have the benefit of seeing his scar in person, but just from viewing the picture he provided, his scar does not appear raised or even discolored. After observing endless linear scars from HTs for nearly three decades, he does not appear to me to have that issue. From my expereince, very few patients have an issue of healing with wide or raised scars relating to how they heal. His looks very clean, just wide.

These are just my observations from a lay person.

caresabouthairs
01-24-2009, 01:12 PM
No one should really know what your scar is from unless they have looked into hair transplant surgery...or have had one.


They sell a scar creme at your local Walgreens for about 20 bucks. It worked for me. I used it on my donor scar when healing...

I had a bad scar on my arm from a tattoo I had removed with a lazer and the creme reduced the pink color very much.


On a lighter note...I worked in an office when I had my transplant done where there was no option of wearing a hat during the recovery.

I told the girls I worked with that I had fell off a peer in the lake and had to get stitches in the back of my head. As far as my frontal hairline...I covered it with my wifes make up and said I had some bad sun burn!!!!

No one knew the better!!!

gillenator
01-26-2009, 12:23 PM
No one should really know what your scar is from unless they have looked into hair transplant surgery...or have had one.


They sell a scar creme at your local Walgreens for about 20 bucks. It worked for me. I used it on my donor scar when healing...

I had a bad scar on my arm from a tattoo I had removed with a lazer and the creme reduced the pink color very much.


On a lighter note...I worked in an office when I had my transplant done where there was no option of wearing a hat during the recovery.

I told the girls I worked with that I had fell off a peer in the lake and had to get stitches in the back of my head. As far as my frontal hairline...I covered it with my wifes make up and said I had some bad sun burn!!!!

No one knew the better!!!

Was it Mederma cream that you used for the scars?

the B spot
01-31-2009, 09:02 PM
Excellent information Gillenator/Dr. Gabel!!!!

Varonil--- I can appreciate your situation---your story is one that we have heard many, many, unfortunate times. However, there are options--- From the pic you provided, your scar is not overly long, or overly wide and as mid 90's closures go, is not that bad(based on the pic).

However, 150 fue grafts will not make a huge difference in your overall appearance with your head shaved like it is.

It could be the 150 grafts were merely to test the vascularity of your scar tissue and test the potential re-growth of a larger follow-up session----I'm not really sure, so I will just state that I believe 300-350 grafts would provide better camouflage---not to completely eradicate the presence of a scar, but to break it up enough as to render it less of a conversation piece.

Also, if the tissue must be removed, Gillenator is right that a resection can be performed, any grafts removed transplanted to help disguise the old work, and a new scar produced that has a higher likelihood of accepting FUE grafts to disguise it.

Of course, that doesn't help you select the right clinic for you, etc... I would suggest working with Gillenator who is an independent patient advocate and can offer unbiased help--He has helped MANY people in your situation.

Take Care,
Jason

McLovin
03-03-2009, 12:26 PM
Dear Gillenator,

I really appreciate your thoughtful note, and the historic background info on the development of HT techniques. How I wish I would have waited a while longer.. but I was young and "the sky was falling on me" because of hairloss. Being out on a mining site is reason for my delayed reply.

There's a little more to my story. Slightly after the picture was taken I did go to a Dr. Jones (Oakville, Canada) who said he could reduce my scar by about 75% with FUE implants into it. His opinion was that a scar revision had a significant probability of stretching back out. They said they just happened to have an opening the next day (as opposed to a long wait) so I took it. I had 150 grafts put into the scar; that was October 23rd, 2008. I must say the scar does appear a little smaller to me now, but it certainly hasn't diminished 75%. Dr. Jones said to check in with him in March so I will give it some more time.

From what I can gather Dr. Jones seems to have a good reputation and gets a lot of publicity from talks and articles he gives. I will however research other options for additional procedures.

Do you know if having had FUE implants would complicate me from having a scar revision? I guess one good way to find out and get an opinion from another highly reputable doctor.

Lets just back up a second. Dr. Jones does not have a good reputation at all. He is best known for poor growth and excessively large scars. I had a procedure with him and the results are very poor and the scarring is awful. Jones originally dealt with me by lying to my face reassuring me that my results were normal. I bought this BS from post-op months 6 to 12. Jones originally planned a density of 100 hairs/cm^2 and told me I would have a pencil line scar. At 6 months post-op I was very concerned about the density and he assured me it was now 70 hairs/cm^2. At 1 year post-op Jones again reassured me that the density was 70 hairs/cm^2. After I did some research and realized that my results were well below par I took action. After numerous consultations my density seems to be in the range of 20 hairs/cm^2 and my scar was measured at 6mm (double the width of what is acceptable). I confronted Dr. Jones with these facts and he chose to ignore my emails. He even went to the extent of setting filters on my email (so messages sent would be returned to sender). I chose to picket outside his office. What I learned through all of this is that I WAS NOT ALONE. Dr. Jones has countless patients who have been scarred and given less then desirable results. After weeks of picketing Dr. Jones offered to fix-up the scar and add density to the front. However, all the doctors I consulted with advised me that it would be in my best interest to have a PROFESSIONAL repair the damage that had been done.

As for his opening the next day - this seems quite fitting. All the reputable doctors usually book 3- 4 months in advance.

Best of luck on your future repairs.

PayDay
03-03-2009, 02:43 PM
That ďjust so happened to have an opening the next dayĒ pitch is never a good sign. It sounds to me that has preyed on your emotions and went in for the quick kill. How have things worked out for you? Does your scar look any better?

varonil
04-29-2009, 02:53 PM
Hi Steven,
I'm really sorry I haven't got back to you sooner. I just haven't checked this blog out for awhile, and I guess I thought I would get notifications if I had comments.
I do have stretch marks between my shoulders and biceps from the heavy working out I did in highschool (never used steroids). So perhaps I am prone to scarring. I have got pretty good results from the FUE into the scar and will post those in a few minutes.
Now what I'd like to do is remove my old hairline grafts and repair the cobblestoning and just keep my head shaved close.
I will check this blog more regularly now, but can also be reached at acmc75@gmail.com
Adam

varonil
04-29-2009, 03:15 PM
Hi guys,
Thanks so much for all your input; it is very very valuable to me.
I'm going to post a few pics of before and after the scar camouflage surgery I had.
McLovin I am considering going back to Dr. Jones because I am happy with the work, but your unfortunate experience with him makes me pause - I never want to go through the trauma of a bad procedure again. I am open to alternatives so Gillenator perhaps you can drop me a line or some recommendations, again everyone, my direct email is acmc75@gmail.com

so attached is my before picture, and then 2 pictures about 4.5 months later. The later picture may have a couple days more growth than the before picture, but I think the difference is pretty clear.

caresabouthairs
04-29-2009, 04:39 PM
The name of the scar cream is "Scar Gel" Walgreens brand. The active ingredient is Glyceryl Polymethacrylate.

Check it out, it is worth it.!!

McLovin
04-29-2009, 05:05 PM
Hi guys,
Thanks so much for all your input; it is very very valuable to me.
I'm going to post a few pics of before and after the scar camouflage surgery I had.
McLovin I am considering going back to Dr. Jones because I am happy with the work, but your unfortunate experience with him makes me pause - I never want to go through the trauma of a bad procedure again. I am open to alternatives so Gillenator perhaps you can drop me a line or some recommendations, again everyone, my direct email is acmc75@gmail.com

so attached is my before picture, and then 2 pictures about 4.5 months later. The later picture may have a couple days more growth than the before picture, but I think the difference is pretty clear.

Hey Varonil, I am happy I could be of service. Suffering from a bad HT stinks.

The work Jones did on your scar looks decent. If I were you I would quit while I was ahead. Jones track record is sketchy at best. The fact that he did a not bad job on your repair guarantees nothing about the next procedure. Even the worst baseball players still bat .100.

The scar is definitely filling in and you still have 3 or 4 months for potential growth. I wish you the best on this one and I hope you are happy with your results.

The scar Jones left me with measured at 6mm. It is a huge gash on the back of my head. I have decided to get it re-sutured. I have booked a procedure with Dr. Rahal and he will cut out the scar and properly close it. Judging from my scar I got with Jones I would almost assume it was his first surgery ever. The sad part is he has been doing this for a while.

As I said in a previous post, Jones offered to do FUE into my scar at no cost. I happily denied this. After consulting with reputable surgeons it was agreed upon that my best bet was to have this repaired by a Professional Hair Transplant Surgeon. I am very confident in Dr. Rahals skills and ability.

I wish you the best with this. I know how embarrassing a huge scar on the back of your head can be. Especially when people start asking you "what is that?", "Do you know you have a huge scar on the back of your head?" , "Where did you get that from?", "It looks like a perfect line".

McLovin
04-29-2009, 05:23 PM
Here is a pic of Dr. Jones' handy work.

gillenator
04-29-2009, 10:03 PM
Here is a pic of Dr. Jones' handy work.

McLovin,

I really respect your transparency and straight talk. Very few patients with visible scarring would be willing to share their story for the benefit of other patients. Is there a reason why you do not wear your hair longer in the back to better hide the scar?

And if you don't mind my saying, IMO as long as you have the laxity for the scar revision, yes that's the best way to approach it because if you can get it down to 1mm, it will be a huge difference. Honestly, attempting to fill a 6mm wide scar would be a major undertaking and probably never quite get it to the point you need it. I have seen it enough times. It would take multiple passes and obviously depending on the blood flow, the yield through the scar tissue will vary. Your scar is very light; almost white. From many years of observing scars and scar repair including many FUE into scar cases, when the scar itself is that light, the blood flow is greatly compromised. That's why removing as much of it as possible only increases your chances of success. IMHO, having multiple FUE sessions would just make someone that much richer and it's not the patient. I mean I don't think we need any in depth medical training to know that.

By the way, is Dr. Rahal going to consider employing the trico-closure technique to further disquise your linear scar? Your in good hands. He does good work and he also cares about his patients. Tell him I said hello.

And lastly, IMHO, you do not look even in the least way prone to scarring. Again, I think the revision is the right way to go and should make a big difference.

Would you be willing to share your progess with pics? Thanks again McLovin.

varonil
04-30-2009, 01:22 PM
Yeah, when anyone asks about the scar, it really knocks me down. For many years my greatest wish was to be able to shave my head and be one of those sleek bald guys with a babe on his arm - know what I mean? It killed me to know my own decision (with a bad doctor - Dr. Taylor from Burlington) was the architect of my own demise.

McLovin - when did Dr. Jones perform his surgery on you? And in that case it was a strip scar and not FUE obviously.

Do you have Dr. Rahal's contact info? Where is he based? Its probably worth another opinion.

thanks again!

tbtadmin
04-30-2009, 01:51 PM
Yeah, when anyone asks about the scar, it really knocks me down. For many years my greatest wish was to be able to shave my head and be one of those sleek bald guys with a babe on his arm - know what I mean? It killed me to know my own decision (with a bad doctor - Dr. Taylor from Burlington) was the architect of my own demise.

McLovin - when did Dr. Jones perform his surgery on you? And in that case it was a strip scar and not FUE obviously.

Do you have Dr. Rahal's contact info? Where is he based? Its probably worth another opinion.

thanks again!

Rahal Hair Transplant
1883 Bank Street
Ottawa, ON K1V 7Z9
Canada
Ph. 1-877-712-HAIR
613-739-3044

varonil
05-01-2009, 09:33 AM
Hey guys, what is the best way to know if a doctor is reputable? Other than this blog? Do formal agencies keep track?
McLovin, you mentionned the Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons for the Toronto area - do they publicly disclose information?

varonil
05-19-2009, 12:42 PM
Hi McLovin, et all.
I'm looking closer at Dr. Rahal, or the Shapiro Medical Group (the two seemingly most recommended clinics on this forum), for removing my old hairline grafts and splicing them into my scar. I'm wondering have you had the procedure with Rahal yet?
cheers,
Adam
p.s. does anyone know a reputable Dr. in the Toronto area?

Tsakalos
05-19-2009, 01:18 PM
that scar doesnt look bad at all. why does it bother u so much ?

Anyway although fue in scar works, the survival rate is less than it would be on normal skin becouse there is not enough blood flow for the grafts to survive since vessels are cut even if the doc performs accurate extractions and not damaging any grafts (which is also something to consider)

I think u should get a consultation from a top doc in case u want to have a good ht in the frontal, that whats i whould do if i were u.

If u still feel that the scar is more important than the frontal and middle scalp appearance try consealing it with dermatch, it works well for scars. and i repeat the scar aint bad at all especially for a surgery in 1995, just a bit low.

No matter how many grafts u FUE into the scar it will ALWAYS be visible when u buzz the head, and usually people who do this kind of scar repair they do it in order to reduce the scar with shorter hair cuts but not buzzing.

Another option is to get revised by trichophytic closure

regards

Zao
05-19-2009, 01:28 PM
I agree, the scar does not look too bad, but I do think itís a good idea to have a reputable doctor like Dr. Rahal or Dr. Shapiro take a look at you. Iím sure any doctor in the IAHRS would be honest and tell you if you can benefit from more transplants into the scar.

Tsakalos
05-19-2009, 02:44 PM
McLovin,

I really respect your transparency and straight talk. Very few patients with visible scarring would be willing to share their story for the benefit of other patients. .

how come ? i dont see any reason why someone who posts his results wont say that his scar is bothering him. in fact i ve keep seeing dozens of people who do..

varonil
05-19-2009, 07:40 PM
Hi guys, thanks for your comments. I think the scar has improved remarkably with the FUE inserts and I'm less bothered about it now. I went with Dr. Jones' advice for the FUE vs the trichophytic as he felt there was a risk that I'm prone to scar stretching.

I'm confident in buzzing my hair much shorter now to a #1 shaver setting, so the FUE has made a difference even to that length (making the scar more faded).

My purpose in getting one more revision surgery is to
A) remove the old hairline plugs (which I now bic as they grow in as thicker hairs than the thin ones I have remaining). and
B) to see if I can't use those to camouflage my scar even more - every bit helps, and maybe I can buzz to a zero!

I may do a another hr transplant in the future, but because my balding is very extensive I understand I would need a hell of a lot of surgery, and well I think I can look pretty sharp with a shaved head for now.

gillenator
05-22-2009, 10:39 AM
Hi guys, thanks for your comments. I think the scar has improved remarkably with the FUE inserts and I'm less bothered about it now. I went with Dr. Jones' advice for the FUE vs the trichophytic as he felt there was a risk that I'm prone to scar stretching.

I'm confident in buzzing my hair much shorter now to a #1 shaver setting, so the FUE has made a difference even to that length (making the scar more faded).

My purpose in getting one more revision surgery is to
A) remove the old hairline plugs (which I now bic as they grow in as thicker hairs than the thin ones I have remaining). and
B) to see if I can't use those to camouflage my scar even more - every bit helps, and maybe I can buzz to a zero!

I may do a another hr transplant in the future, but because my balding is very extensive I understand I would need a hell of a lot of surgery, and well I think I can look pretty sharp with a shaved head for now.

If you're happy, that's the bottom line.

varonil
12-17-2009, 01:58 PM
Hi Everyone,

I just want to share with you the results of the scar repair procedures I had with Dr. Robert Jones. These were to repair a bad hair transplant done by a different doctor (Dr. Taylor) in 1995. As I've said, the original transplant was the worst decision of my life, it left me with an ugly and apparent surgical scar as well as wiry unnatural looking transplanted hair along my hairline. My goal was to be able to shave my head again with confidence. This album shows how with Dr. Jones help, we've made great progress.

PLEASE CLICK ON MY PROFILE TO REVIEW ALBUM AND STEP BY STEP PROGRESS

I've also included before and after pics here
pic 1 - prior to Oct08 procedure with Dr. Jones
pic 2 - June09, result of first procedure
pic 3 - Dec09, after a couple more small procedures (mainly as an afterthought to remove hairline grafts)

ALSO IN MY PROFILE FIND PICS OF MY HAIRLINE WHERE I HAD THE OLD GRAFTS REMOVED

gillenator
07-26-2010, 11:26 AM
varonil,

You sure have come a long way. I wonder if PRP therapy would improve the coloration any further. Have you looked into that at all?

varonil
08-22-2010, 02:03 PM
Hi Gillenator,

I have not looked into PRP therapy. I just peaked now and saw that some doctors are using it at the time of transplant surgery. I'm not sure if it would help me as my scar is long set. Any thoughts?

gillenator
08-25-2010, 02:04 PM
Hi Gillenator,

I have not looked into PRP therapy. I just peaked now and saw that some doctors are using it at the time of transplant surgery. I'm not sure if it would help me as my scar is long set. Any thoughts?

varonil,

The initial use of PRP therapy was intended to advance and faciltate wound healing both in the interior and exterior. There are other new treatments on the horizon Acell that are demonstrating advances in wound and scar healing.

Try to contact Dr. Cooley in North Carolina for more info and his opinion of your case. I think you will find it enlightening.

marcello
04-02-2011, 04:21 AM
When i ready your post i see exactly myself, i had the exact same experience, had a transplant done in 1998, i must say the scar has been bothering me since. I was only 22 years then and i believe the doctor lied to me by saying the scar will be very small, he never showed me pictures of donor site, and had i known the permanent scar size i would never have done the surgery. I am like you, have been wanting to wear my hair short but not able since the surgery. Having looked at your FUE i am a little encouraged but more careful now that i will do my research first.
I still hate the fact that doctors like yours and mien pray on the insecurities of young guys just to gain more money.
I have had friends that wanted to do the procedure and after showing them my scar all of them changed their mind.

gillenator
04-05-2011, 11:24 AM
Have you been physically examined by a proven HT sugeon with a good reputation in repair? I am referring to both a possible scar revision and/or FUE.

chop
07-04-2011, 03:38 PM
I wish you the best with this. I know how embarrassing a huge scar on the back of your head can be. Especially when people start asking you "what is that?", "Do you know you have a huge scar on the back of your head?" , "Where did you get that from?", "It looks like a perfect line".

What do you tell them?

1. Brain surgery?
2. Boat accident?
3. Hairstyle?

t-bone
07-04-2011, 05:11 PM
I know it sucks! There are treatments to make less noticeable.I have tried cortizone shots,prp and had transdermal hair replication.

mattg3
07-07-2011, 02:58 PM
As a newcomer but not to hair transplants let me say nothing screwed up my life more than my awful transplants.I got them about 34 years ago and they always looked awful.Ended up giving up and joining hair club and then just regular local wig seller for 25 years.
At 64 i would love to shave my head but my scars are the old style circles and not the tiny ones they do today.Wish i had one of those line scars for i feel that can easily be shrugged off as old accident scar but what the hell can you do with neckline full of white round circles.Resigned my self to just keeping on with my wig wearing.

varonil
07-08-2011, 05:18 AM
Matt G,
I feel for you man. All I can say is that when I feel bad about my line scar I should realize its not so bad. But even though you've got something worse than me brother, they do wonders with corrective repairs these days. Its never too late to make a change. I've also found that we are our own worst enemy: I'm sure you can make up a story like the commies tortured you in Nam!
Best of luck dealing with this life issue. There are worse things out there.
Varonil

varonil
07-08-2011, 05:21 AM
I've used various explanations:

2. Boat accident works
I also used that I got skated over the head while playing ice hockey.
I've also told people the truth (depending who it is); my girlfriend didn't make a big deal about it at all actually.

mattg3
07-08-2011, 07:28 AM
Thanks Varonil.Sorry but the nam thing made me laugh my ass off.What torture would they do to leave a man with those awful white holes all over my head?For me i just cant see outlaying a bunch of cash and going through more surgery to end up the bald guy i was back in my late 20s.Im used to the wig but there are times whan I want to just rip it off and say to hell with it.Ive had so many one night stands mainly because you dont have to explain anything.Long term girl friend liked the wig but that was a while ago.
Wish the hell i was a young guy now since almost everyone has shaved heads.In the 60s and 70s hair was a major issue.Cant remember any young people who were bald,especially celebrities or sports figures.Your so right.WE ARE OUR OWN WORST ENEMY

gillenator
07-08-2011, 01:34 PM
I've used various explanations:

2. Boat accident works
I also used that I got skated over the head while playing ice hockey.
I've also told people the truth (depending who it is); my girlfriend didn't make a big deal about it at all actually.

I truly believe that HTs are more socially accepted as a cosmetic improvement vs the stigma it used to have. Obviously world class results speak for themselves.

chop
07-09-2011, 08:00 AM
I've used various explanations:
I also used that I got skated over the head while playing ice hockey.


That would explain the straight line actually. The boating accident doesn't seem convincing.

evjt327
07-28-2011, 09:01 PM
I've used various explanations:

2. Boat accident works
I also used that I got skated over the head while playing ice hockey.
I've also told people the truth (depending who it is); my girlfriend didn't make a big deal about it at all actually.

The Fue is really hiding the scar

evjt327
07-28-2011, 09:05 PM
Fue will be next

gillenator
07-29-2011, 02:12 PM
varonil,

You sure have come a long way. I wonder if PRP therapy would improve the coloration any further. Have you looked into that at all?

Have you looked into combining Acell with PRP?

Stevie R
08-11-2012, 02:12 AM
@ varinoil hey man how many FUEs did you put in your scar? Do people still notice it? How wide was your scar? Did you go for another pass after all? Did you remove the grafts from the front? Updates would be appreciate as I am trying to camo my scar as well

Stevedawg18
07-20-2016, 12:53 PM
I don't think there is any shame in just saying I was young and insecure and got a hair transplant that didn't turn out well. I think most people could relate to that.

thehatman
07-21-2016, 05:29 AM
Hi why don't you just get a tattoo that imitate the look of a buzzed hair...problem solved