View Full Version : Turning 29 with a thinned out crown

07-24-2010, 02:12 PM
It is funny to think at one point I had to have my hair thinned due to it being a matt when I was younger. Now I am 29 and have lost numerous amount of hair on my crown. The frontal portion of my hairline is not bad in my opinion. I am considering hair transplant surgery. I just started to take fin and bought some Nizarol shampoo to help out. I have read many articles and the internet can be one stupid place as I am a computer grad. This forum is great. I am in Calgary are in Canada and was wondering if there is any surgeons in this area that can be trusted to do this surgery. As Dr. Wong and Hassan in Vancouver are along ways to travel.

!. I am hoping there is a surgeon nearby that can help me?

2. Would I be a good candidate for hair transplant surgery?

3. If so would anyone be able to give me a ballpark cost on this as I need to save money.

Anyway thanks for listening. Sorry if my pictures are not great but they give you something to go off.

07-28-2010, 05:22 AM
I was going to have free scholarship to study in USA but my name didn't come out on the list, I was so desperate. I was so close to give up but suddenly I just checked google one more time and I was shocking! Alvi Armani opened a branch in Dubai. I forgot about the scholarship I went straight to him in the next day and now I'm going to have hair transplant in August :)

What I did is. I made my decision and I'm going for it no matter what.

just remember Old is Gold :)

07-28-2010, 09:36 AM
If you have recently begun taken finasteride, I would recommend that you continue trying it for at least 6 months to a year to see if it can stabilize your hair loss and possibly even re-grow some hair in the crown. I agree that your frontal hairline looks good at this point, and I wouldn't worry about placing any grafts there yet.

The problem with transplanting hair to the crown is that this area requires a large number of grafts to achieve a desirable density. Dr. Cole generally recommends that men wait as long as possible before attempting surgical restoration in the crown area, so as not to deplete their donor supply prematurely (particularly if they will likely need some grafts for the frontal hairline area later in life).

The crown is also a technically difficult region to work in because of the multi-directional growth of hair. For this reason, if you do decide to have work done in this area, it is very important that you select an experienced doctor who can handle the aesthetic difficulties in appropriately placing and spacing recipient sites, and selecting the ideal sized graft for each one. You also do not want a physican to be too aggressive in this region, as this can deplete your donor supply quickly, and even lead to shock loss of the native hair.

I would recommend that you continue trying medical therapies for now. If you later decide to proceed with a hair transplant, find a physician certified by the IAHRS and understand that you may need to travel a ways to ensure you are going to a doctor who will give you the best, and most natural, results. You should never base a life-changing decision simply on price or proximity.