View Full Version : "ACell" to be or not to be.... that IS the Question!

07-19-2010, 10:04 AM
Over the past few weeks I've started researching the new ACell treatment that several are considering a medical breakthrough for skin and scar regeneration.
After contacting the company, Doc Cole, Doc Cooley and several others working on the concept I found the following: The only Doc's actually working hand in hand with the ACell company at this time is Jerry Cooley and Hitzig. Cole is just using it as a test treatment and does not have much in line of actual achievements as of yet...

He only started using it in January 2010....His personal vies is that he's not to hope full in its cloning hair capabilities but is willing to try it on scar tissue regeneration...

Now Hitzig in my opinion is nothing but a butcher AND NOTHING LESS regardless of his input on the subject....I feel he is just using this concept to lure more young guys to his table as I'm sure his reputation has started to lead many people away from his clinic......

I personally feel this way for 2 reasons.....1) Hitzig's Long Island medical organization is the reason for all my scars and T-plant misfortunes due to his so called patented linier punch tools.....most if not all the grafts sunk and pitted in my extremely low at the time hairline...(1996).......2) knowing a little about his practice first hand I know all to well he HAS USED underhanded and misleading information in the past......

He is also in 2010 STILL USING PUNCH GRAFTS in his work!

As for Cooley.....I spoke with him in person a few days ago and said he will be posing his 1.5 year research on the subject in the upcoming October hair transplant seminar being held in Boston he also said they have been seeing some remarkable things with scar treatments......the treatments however for hair cloning is still not applicable yet......but found a unique way to pluck a hair and regenerate a single folicle ....I feel its about 75% or so so 100 plucked hairs should grow about 75 give or take a few.....But there is still no garantee anything will grow at all

ACell's company in itself really is working toward the goal of tissue regeneration of body parts that may indeed include skin scar regeneration.......

I will be patiently waiting for the 1.5 year update coming out in October for its credible or not so creditable treatment results

Feller is not offering the treatment yet,....... He said however He may start using if he see's some positive results and benefits from it............. Other then for scar revision it may be the best technique in my opinion FOR repair work........

Feller does not do much in terms of repair work other then adding more grafts....Not that its the wrong approach but just the easy fix IMO.........I personally want my scalp back first and foremost! .....................Nither is Bernstien

Cooley is also offering his Plucking technique according to what he showed me in his research. So out of 100 plucked/tweezed hairs 75 or so should grow (But there is no guarantee's)

The plucking technique just plucks out a hair and bathes it with Acell then plants the plucked hair into a scar and if results prove to be consistent it will regenerate the follicle

He offered this to me for a trial price that I feel is somewhat high being a trial

HOWEVER.....I feel if i could get a group of people on board with this test I could talk him down to a more reasonable price for all of us....

Its not crazy expensive but enough that if you wanted to really try to build up the density in a scar it would cost to much

The only draw back is that it will as of now only produce a single hair graph It wont generate a follicular unit at least not yet... So if anyone is interested in being in this group or wants to learn more please contact me in person...


07-21-2010, 03:35 AM
I'm a member of 3 different groups and would love to share my experiences and findings with all

However I have not found 1 single person that's interested in this ground breaking research group yet!

I feel if i could get a small group together we may be able to get a better feel for the research and not to mention a better price.

A scar revision may not be the best tactic in my case as the scar is very high though i would love to remove it and use Acell to try and get a tight close. But for now Cooley wants to try the plucking technique

I also have about 20-25 small FUE size pits in my lower hairline along with about 35 or so more throughout my top 1/3 from the Hitzig punch tool back in 97

So i will try several small test removals first to see the actual results from Acell

But with more people I think we could go in as a group for a much more accurate evaluation

Can someone help?

07-24-2010, 01:09 AM
Cooley is also offering his Plucking technique according to what he showed me in his research. So out of 100 plucked/tweezed hairs 75 or so should grow (But there is no guarantee's)

The plucking technique just plucks out a hair and bathes it with Acell then plants the plucked hair into a scar and if results prove to be consistent it will regenerate the follicle
And here is what Dr. Gary Hitzig is saying about his ACell approaches (interview):

Dr. Hitzig ACell interview
Because of its unique ability to heal a variety of full-thickness wounds with no visible scarring, many people in the hair transplant community have been inquiring about the use of ACell MatriStem products during hair restoration procedures.

This recent press release from Dr. Jerry Cooley and Dr. Gary Hitzig indicated that the ECM products developed by ACell, Inc. might indeed be very effective for this purpose. In order to address the growing skepticism/excitement regarding ACell’s ability to heal donor scars and regenerate donor hair, Dr. Gary Hitzig was kind enough to grant RejuveNation Premium Members with an exclusive interview to explain the procedure.
How long have you been experimenting with ACell’s MatriStem products?
Since September 2008, when the FDA approved it for use.

How many patients have you treated?
The initial cohort I treated was between 18 and 20 people. I am currently writing a scientific article based on the results from this group; explaining the rationale behind the unique regenerative process we’ve observed. Once all of the documentation has been organized and all of the patient follow-ups have been completed, the research will be sent to ACell for verification of claims. Publication should follow shortly thereafter.
More recently, however, I’ve been able to treat a slightly larger group with a much wider array of applications. This is the most exciting aspect of my research.
In regards to ACell, what applications have you tested thus far?
Scar reductions, plucked hair duplication, recipient injections, virgin scalp donor regeneration and a new gel formulation.

Can you expand upon any of these applications for our readers?
Plucked hair duplication involves extracting a hair shaft from an intact follicle and using the DNA present in the bulb of that shaft to regenerate an entirely new follicle. When the plucked hair shaft is re-inserted into the scalp in combination with ACell, we can elicit a new hair growth that cycles normally and is cosmetically acceptable. This is a slightly modified version of a previous “auto-cloning” technique that has had inconsistent results to date.
Recipient injections occur during hair transplants. We place grafts in a fashion consistent with normal hair restoration procedures, but we also inject a liquid suspension of ACell into the recipient area. Using this method, we have been able to increase hair counts from 50-400%. That means that in the best case scenario, we can get 4 follicles for every 1 that is implanted.
We are also working on a gel that can be injected in between existing hairs for this same purpose. However, it is too early to say whether or not this procedure will ultimately be successful.

How effective is auto-cloning when ACell is used? Is it possible for a complete hair transplant surgery to be conducted with only plucked hair follicles? If not, is it practical to assume that auto-cloning could be used as an adjunct to “thicken up” a previous transplant?
I don’t know. It would be quite tedious. It is more practical to do a transplant first, and then increase density with injections. This would be more ideal. I should note that this is still experimental, however.
Has the company been supportive of this process?
Yes, ACell has been extremely helpful during this stage of research and experimentation. The company understands that if we knew the answer to every question, we wouldn’t be sitting here trying to figure it all out. Research starts with learning.
Think of it like this: Was Follicular Unit Extraction effective at first? No, it had its share of pros and cons. But these things are only really realized over time.
Of course it would be preferable to carry out these studies in secret, but we recognize that some people are really deeply affected by the scarring associated with prior hair transplant procedures. Like anyone else, I don’t want to give people sub-par results and I don’t want to let people down with false hopes. Nevertheless, I also don’t want to keep this a secret if it can potentially help a large population of people. In choosing this path, I also chose to take personal responsibility for all of the criticism that manifests. I’m fine with that.
Having said this, expectations MUST BE OBJECTIVE. We have very clear consent forms. We do not recruit people that expect something we cannot provide. We are trying our best, and we do have very promising preliminary results. But, like they say, “prior successes are not an indication of future results.” Wound healing and regeneration is quite a variable process. ACell understands this, we understand this, and our patients understand this.

Why do you think this process works?
This is something I plan on extrapolating upon with the current article I’m working on.
It’s pretty technical, but I can summarize it like this: Essentially, all tissue has an extracellular matrix (ECM). I like to call it “mother nature’s biological scaffold.” It’s a production of a chemical that each tissue possesses for its specific phenotype. ECM is the primary tool for cellular attachment, production and final differentiation of tissue.
Certain areas of the body (like the bladder and small intestine) have a much higher concentrated and evolved form of ECM. Also, only certain organs have a basement membrane along with their ECM. This basement membrane is critical for healing after wound injury. It plays an important role in remodeling tissue during the healing process. ACell provides this “scaffolding” to areas of the body that are obviously not able to regenerate themselves.
To reconstruct new tissue you need three things: 1) Cells, 2) scaffolds and 3) bioactive molecules. ACell’s proprietary ECM provides all of these and organizes the migration and final differentiation of epidermal cells. “Line up, differentiate, prevent the default (scar tissue).”
After the host cells are recruited, the scaffold gets broken apart and disintegrated, then the new stem cells migrate to the area and replace it with new, host-derived tissue.
This has already been demonstrated in many human and animal studies. More recently, it’s been quite successful at repair and subsequent reconstruction of dermal structures in hundreds of thousands of patients.