View Full Version : 29yr old Female Seeking Advice on Dr. Schweiger or Dr. Sadick

04-06-2010, 05:59 PM
HELP!! I am a 29yr old female suffering from HAIRLOSS for the past 6yrs. I have seen countless doctors and none of them give me hope. My family all has thick hair including my 65yr old parents. I have been to every specialist and they all give me 5% minoxidil and spironolactone, however neither has helped the regrowth. Below is my most recent biopsy which was VERY painful and my doctors response was "ready for a hair transplant?" All signs point to hereditary hair loss so I am not sure what additional steps I can take. I am desperately seeking advice on whether or not I should get 2000 grafts from Dr. Schweiger from Bernstein Medical. I had a consultation with him this week and I qualify as a candidate however the cost is tremendous ($12,000) and I am concerned about the results/recovery period. I currently see Dr. Sadick for treatment (lasers, spironolactone) however I have not read ANYTHING on his results from transplants.

Any insight on either doctor or my condition would be greatly appreciated. I would give anything to have my hair back to the way it was 6 yrs ago. Thoughts? Advice? Help?!?

Thank you! :)

Desperately seeking Answers.
Clinical information
1. 2mm punch. Mid inf. Scalp frontal submitted for DIF, B. 4mm punch mid frontal superior scalp: A, B:/Female pattern hair loss, autoimmune hairloss. 704.00. IDX mc

A. skin, mid inferior scalp frontal, submitted for5 DIF:
- Positive lupus band test of IgM isotype

Comment (specimen a):
There is a fairly striking deposition of IgM along the dermal-epidermal junction and as well there is staining within the epithelium for IgA, IgM and IgG essentially defining a very immunoreactant profile. This profile is not dissimilar to other cases of androgenetic alopecia

2. Skin, mid frontal superior scalp:
- Non-scarring alopecia consistent with androgenetic alopecia

Comment (specimen b):
The findings are those of a fairly advances state of non-scarring alopecia. I would tend to favor a diagnosis of androgenetic alopecia. There is one terminal hair unit however that suggests the possibility of alopecia areata although I do not see frank lymphocyctic bulbitis. I am curious to know if in fact this patent has and clinical features of alopecia areata. If indeed the clinical presentation is more in keeping with common baldness I would interpret the process as an inflammatory immunogenic variant of androgenetic alopecia, especially given the very impressive immunoflurescent profile. We will destain slide B1 (D4-6) to see if we can actually identify any lymphocytes permeating the bulbar epithelium

Microscopic description
Direct immunofluorescent studies have been performed on specimen A, the results of which are as follows:

IgG: There is +1-2/3 fine granular staining of epidermal keratinocytes within the epidermis and hair follicle
IgA: There is a fairly intense granular staining in the sebocytes and other root sheath of a hair follicle as well as +1-2/3 fine granular staining of epidermal keratinocytes
IgM: There is a continuous band of +3/3 granular staining along the dermal-epidermal junction as well as +3/3 granular staining within the basement membrane zone of the hair follicle
C3: significant immunoreactivity is not identified
C3d: there is an interrupted band of +1-2/3 fine granular staining along the dermal-epidermal junction and within the follicular basement membrane zone
C4d: negative

There is an average normal number of anagen hair follicles however they appear shorter and thinner. There is a superficial and mild perivascular and slightly perifolliclar infiltrate predominantly of lymphocytes. PAS stain fails to reveal fungal hyphae or a thickened basement membrane. There are yeasts of Pityrosporum on the epidermal surface

09-23-2014, 06:34 AM
I had two hair transplants from Dr. Sadick. Feel free to message me with questions.